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Biological Targeting of Plasmonic Nanoparticles Improves Cellular Imaging via the Enhanced Scattering in the Aggregates Formed.

Aioub M, Kang B, Mackey MA, El-Sayed MA - J Phys Chem Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: Nuclear-targeted AuNPs showed the greatest scattering due to the formation of denser nanoparticle clusters (i.e., increased localization).We also obtained a dynamic profile of AuNP localization in living cells, indicating that nuclear localization is directly related to the number of nuclear-targeting peptides on the AuNP surface.Increased localization led to increased plasmonic field coupling, resulting in significantly higher scattering intensity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laser Dynamics Laboratory, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology , Atlanta, Georgia 30332, United States.

ABSTRACT
Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) demonstrate great promise in biomedical applications due to their plasmonically enhanced imaging properties. When in close proximity, AuNPs plasmonic fields couple together, increasing their scattering cross-section due to the formation of hot spots, improving their imaging utility. In the present study, we modified the AuNPs surface with different peptides to target the nucleus and/or the cell as a whole, resulting in similar cellular uptake but different scattering intensities. Nuclear-targeted AuNPs showed the greatest scattering due to the formation of denser nanoparticle clusters (i.e., increased localization). We also obtained a dynamic profile of AuNP localization in living cells, indicating that nuclear localization is directly related to the number of nuclear-targeting peptides on the AuNP surface. Increased localization led to increased plasmonic field coupling, resulting in significantly higher scattering intensity. Thus, biochemical targeting of plasmonic nanoparticles to subcellular components is expected to lead to more resolved imaging of cellular processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic of NanoparticleLocalization by the PERSIS System(A) Schematic representationof gold nanoparticle localization within cells during the processof cellular uptake; (B) Diagram of the experimental setup and themeasurement of nanoparticle localization dynamics by PERSIS.
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sch1: Schematic of NanoparticleLocalization by the PERSIS System(A) Schematic representationof gold nanoparticle localization within cells during the processof cellular uptake; (B) Diagram of the experimental setup and themeasurement of nanoparticle localization dynamics by PERSIS.


Biological Targeting of Plasmonic Nanoparticles Improves Cellular Imaging via the Enhanced Scattering in the Aggregates Formed.

Aioub M, Kang B, Mackey MA, El-Sayed MA - J Phys Chem Lett (2014)

Schematic of NanoparticleLocalization by the PERSIS System(A) Schematic representationof gold nanoparticle localization within cells during the processof cellular uptake; (B) Diagram of the experimental setup and themeasurement of nanoparticle localization dynamics by PERSIS.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126704&req=5

sch1: Schematic of NanoparticleLocalization by the PERSIS System(A) Schematic representationof gold nanoparticle localization within cells during the processof cellular uptake; (B) Diagram of the experimental setup and themeasurement of nanoparticle localization dynamics by PERSIS.
Bottom Line: Nuclear-targeted AuNPs showed the greatest scattering due to the formation of denser nanoparticle clusters (i.e., increased localization).We also obtained a dynamic profile of AuNP localization in living cells, indicating that nuclear localization is directly related to the number of nuclear-targeting peptides on the AuNP surface.Increased localization led to increased plasmonic field coupling, resulting in significantly higher scattering intensity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laser Dynamics Laboratory, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology , Atlanta, Georgia 30332, United States.

ABSTRACT
Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) demonstrate great promise in biomedical applications due to their plasmonically enhanced imaging properties. When in close proximity, AuNPs plasmonic fields couple together, increasing their scattering cross-section due to the formation of hot spots, improving their imaging utility. In the present study, we modified the AuNPs surface with different peptides to target the nucleus and/or the cell as a whole, resulting in similar cellular uptake but different scattering intensities. Nuclear-targeted AuNPs showed the greatest scattering due to the formation of denser nanoparticle clusters (i.e., increased localization). We also obtained a dynamic profile of AuNP localization in living cells, indicating that nuclear localization is directly related to the number of nuclear-targeting peptides on the AuNP surface. Increased localization led to increased plasmonic field coupling, resulting in significantly higher scattering intensity. Thus, biochemical targeting of plasmonic nanoparticles to subcellular components is expected to lead to more resolved imaging of cellular processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus