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Perinatal lead (Pb) exposure results in sex-specific effects on food intake, fat, weight, and insulin response across the murine life-course.

Faulk C, Barks A, Sánchez BN, Zhang Z, Anderson OS, Peterson KE, Dolinoy DC - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Data analyses were stratified by sex and adjusted for litter effects.Exposed females and males exhibited increased energy expenditure as compared to controls (p<0.0001 for both).Overall, food intake increased in exposed females and males (p<0.0008 and p<0.0001, respectively) with significant linear trends at 9 months in females (p = 0.01) and 6 months in males (p<0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Developmental lead (Pb) exposure has been associated with lower body weight in human infants and late onset obesity in mice. We determined the association of perinatal Pb exposure in mice with changes in obesity-related phenotypes into adulthood. Mice underwent exposure via maternal drinking water supplemented with 0 (control), 2.1 (low), 16 (medium), or 32 (high) ppm Pb-acetate two weeks prior to mating through lactation. Offspring were phenotyped at ages 3, 6, and 9 months for energy expenditure, spontaneous activity, food intake, body weight, body composition, and at age 10 months for glucose tolerance. Data analyses were stratified by sex and adjusted for litter effects. Exposed females and males exhibited increased energy expenditure as compared to controls (p<0.0001 for both). In females, horizontal activity differed significantly from controls (p = 0.02) over the life-course. Overall, food intake increased in exposed females and males (p<0.0008 and p<0.0001, respectively) with significant linear trends at 9 months in females (p = 0.01) and 6 months in males (p<0.01). Body weight was significantly increased in males at the medium and high exposures (p = 0.001 and p = 0.006). Total body fat differed among exposed females and males (p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively). Insulin response was significantly increased in medium exposure males (p<0.05). Perinatal Pb exposure at blood lead levels between 4.1 µg/dL and 32 µg/dL is associated with increased food intake, body weight, total body fat, energy expenditure, activity, and insulin response in mice. Physiological effects of developmental Pb exposure persist and vary according to sex and age.

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Body Fat.Measured by nuclear magnetic imaging. Females show no linear trend with exposure level. Males show a significant trend of increasing body fat with dose at 3 months, and near significance at 6 months. Stars indicate p-values<0.05 as compared to control offspring.
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pone-0104273-g004: Body Fat.Measured by nuclear magnetic imaging. Females show no linear trend with exposure level. Males show a significant trend of increasing body fat with dose at 3 months, and near significance at 6 months. Stars indicate p-values<0.05 as compared to control offspring.

Mentions: Overall, body fat differed heterogeneously among all Pb exposures for both females and males (p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively) (Fig. 4). In males, a linear trend of increasing body fat across exposures was significant at 3 months (p = 0.03), but not significant at the 6-month (p = 0.08) and 9-month (p = 0.25) time points. No significant linear trend across exposures was seen in females at any time point, nor was an exposure level response observed when compared to controls at any time point. Comparing each exposure group to the control reveals a male-specific increase in body fat at the 6-month time point in the medium group (p = 0.02), and a significant increase at the 16 ppm exposure level at the 9-month time point (p = 0.03) (Fig. 4).


Perinatal lead (Pb) exposure results in sex-specific effects on food intake, fat, weight, and insulin response across the murine life-course.

Faulk C, Barks A, Sánchez BN, Zhang Z, Anderson OS, Peterson KE, Dolinoy DC - PLoS ONE (2014)

Body Fat.Measured by nuclear magnetic imaging. Females show no linear trend with exposure level. Males show a significant trend of increasing body fat with dose at 3 months, and near significance at 6 months. Stars indicate p-values<0.05 as compared to control offspring.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126699&req=5

pone-0104273-g004: Body Fat.Measured by nuclear magnetic imaging. Females show no linear trend with exposure level. Males show a significant trend of increasing body fat with dose at 3 months, and near significance at 6 months. Stars indicate p-values<0.05 as compared to control offspring.
Mentions: Overall, body fat differed heterogeneously among all Pb exposures for both females and males (p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively) (Fig. 4). In males, a linear trend of increasing body fat across exposures was significant at 3 months (p = 0.03), but not significant at the 6-month (p = 0.08) and 9-month (p = 0.25) time points. No significant linear trend across exposures was seen in females at any time point, nor was an exposure level response observed when compared to controls at any time point. Comparing each exposure group to the control reveals a male-specific increase in body fat at the 6-month time point in the medium group (p = 0.02), and a significant increase at the 16 ppm exposure level at the 9-month time point (p = 0.03) (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: Data analyses were stratified by sex and adjusted for litter effects.Exposed females and males exhibited increased energy expenditure as compared to controls (p<0.0001 for both).Overall, food intake increased in exposed females and males (p<0.0008 and p<0.0001, respectively) with significant linear trends at 9 months in females (p = 0.01) and 6 months in males (p<0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Developmental lead (Pb) exposure has been associated with lower body weight in human infants and late onset obesity in mice. We determined the association of perinatal Pb exposure in mice with changes in obesity-related phenotypes into adulthood. Mice underwent exposure via maternal drinking water supplemented with 0 (control), 2.1 (low), 16 (medium), or 32 (high) ppm Pb-acetate two weeks prior to mating through lactation. Offspring were phenotyped at ages 3, 6, and 9 months for energy expenditure, spontaneous activity, food intake, body weight, body composition, and at age 10 months for glucose tolerance. Data analyses were stratified by sex and adjusted for litter effects. Exposed females and males exhibited increased energy expenditure as compared to controls (p<0.0001 for both). In females, horizontal activity differed significantly from controls (p = 0.02) over the life-course. Overall, food intake increased in exposed females and males (p<0.0008 and p<0.0001, respectively) with significant linear trends at 9 months in females (p = 0.01) and 6 months in males (p<0.01). Body weight was significantly increased in males at the medium and high exposures (p = 0.001 and p = 0.006). Total body fat differed among exposed females and males (p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively). Insulin response was significantly increased in medium exposure males (p<0.05). Perinatal Pb exposure at blood lead levels between 4.1 µg/dL and 32 µg/dL is associated with increased food intake, body weight, total body fat, energy expenditure, activity, and insulin response in mice. Physiological effects of developmental Pb exposure persist and vary according to sex and age.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus