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A framework for identifying plant species to be used as 'ecological engineers' for fixing soil on unstable slopes.

Ghestem M, Cao K, Ma W, Rowe N, Leclerc R, Gadenne C, Stokes A - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Significant differences between all factors were found, depending on species.We then combined these results with those concerning root physiological traits, which were used as a proxy for root metabolic activity.We also propose a conceptual model describing how to position plants on an unstable site, based on root system traits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: AgroParis Tech, UMR AMAP, Montpellier, France.

ABSTRACT
Major reforestation programs have been initiated on hillsides prone to erosion and landslides in China, but no framework exists to guide managers in the choice of plant species. We developed such a framework based on the suitability of given plant traits for fixing soil on steep slopes in western Yunnan, China. We examined the utility of 55 native and exotic species with regard to the services they provided. We then chose nine species differing in life form. Plant root system architecture, root mechanical and physiological traits were then measured at two adjacent field sites. One site was highly unstable, with severe soil slippage and erosion. The second site had been replanted 8 years previously and appeared to be physically stable. How root traits differed between sites, season, depth in soil and distance from the plant stem were determined. Root system morphology was analysed by considering architectural traits (root angle, depth, diameter and volume) both up- and downslope. Significant differences between all factors were found, depending on species. We estimated the most useful architectural and mechanical traits for physically fixing soil in place. We then combined these results with those concerning root physiological traits, which were used as a proxy for root metabolic activity. Scores were assigned to each species based on traits. No one species possessed a suite of highly desirable traits, therefore mixtures of species should be used on vulnerable slopes. We also propose a conceptual model describing how to position plants on an unstable site, based on root system traits.

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Mean temperature and precipitations in Liuku.Diagram from Liuku meteorological station situated 30 km south from the field site (source: Meteorological Bureau of Yunnan Province). Data from January 2005 to May 2010. Arrows show the months when roots were collected.
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pone-0095876-g001: Mean temperature and precipitations in Liuku.Diagram from Liuku meteorological station situated 30 km south from the field site (source: Meteorological Bureau of Yunnan Province). Data from January 2005 to May 2010. Arrows show the months when roots were collected.

Mentions: We studied root morphological, mechanical and physiological traits for species growing in the Yunnan province, southern China, where erosion and landslides are severe [46]. The study area (26°01′N, 98°50′E) was located near Daxingdi village, north of Liuku town in the Salween river valley. This part of China is under the influence of the Indian monsoon, and described as a “warm-dry climate”, being a combination of subtropical and alpine climates. Annual mean temperature (from 1961 to 2002) is 15.2°C, and mean annual precipitation is 1200 mm, the majority of which falls between May and October [14], [41]. Numerous landslides occur during the monsoon season (May-October) and soil erosion is severe, largely due to the cutting of roads through the steep slopes [1], [34]. The use of Agava americana L. to fix soil on steep slopes after road building is common practice in the region. We carried out fieldwork in 2009 and 2010. In 2010, precipitation during the summer months was particularly high (Figure 1) and shallow landslides throughout the area were numerous. At our study sites, corn (Zea mays L.) was cultivated from 1980, after deforestation, until 1999 when the SLCP was initiated. Several species of trees and shrubs were then planted, including Agava americana L., Jatropha curcas L., Pueraria stricta Kurz., Ricinus communis L., and Vernicia fordii Helmsl.


A framework for identifying plant species to be used as 'ecological engineers' for fixing soil on unstable slopes.

Ghestem M, Cao K, Ma W, Rowe N, Leclerc R, Gadenne C, Stokes A - PLoS ONE (2014)

Mean temperature and precipitations in Liuku.Diagram from Liuku meteorological station situated 30 km south from the field site (source: Meteorological Bureau of Yunnan Province). Data from January 2005 to May 2010. Arrows show the months when roots were collected.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126646&req=5

pone-0095876-g001: Mean temperature and precipitations in Liuku.Diagram from Liuku meteorological station situated 30 km south from the field site (source: Meteorological Bureau of Yunnan Province). Data from January 2005 to May 2010. Arrows show the months when roots were collected.
Mentions: We studied root morphological, mechanical and physiological traits for species growing in the Yunnan province, southern China, where erosion and landslides are severe [46]. The study area (26°01′N, 98°50′E) was located near Daxingdi village, north of Liuku town in the Salween river valley. This part of China is under the influence of the Indian monsoon, and described as a “warm-dry climate”, being a combination of subtropical and alpine climates. Annual mean temperature (from 1961 to 2002) is 15.2°C, and mean annual precipitation is 1200 mm, the majority of which falls between May and October [14], [41]. Numerous landslides occur during the monsoon season (May-October) and soil erosion is severe, largely due to the cutting of roads through the steep slopes [1], [34]. The use of Agava americana L. to fix soil on steep slopes after road building is common practice in the region. We carried out fieldwork in 2009 and 2010. In 2010, precipitation during the summer months was particularly high (Figure 1) and shallow landslides throughout the area were numerous. At our study sites, corn (Zea mays L.) was cultivated from 1980, after deforestation, until 1999 when the SLCP was initiated. Several species of trees and shrubs were then planted, including Agava americana L., Jatropha curcas L., Pueraria stricta Kurz., Ricinus communis L., and Vernicia fordii Helmsl.

Bottom Line: Significant differences between all factors were found, depending on species.We then combined these results with those concerning root physiological traits, which were used as a proxy for root metabolic activity.We also propose a conceptual model describing how to position plants on an unstable site, based on root system traits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: AgroParis Tech, UMR AMAP, Montpellier, France.

ABSTRACT
Major reforestation programs have been initiated on hillsides prone to erosion and landslides in China, but no framework exists to guide managers in the choice of plant species. We developed such a framework based on the suitability of given plant traits for fixing soil on steep slopes in western Yunnan, China. We examined the utility of 55 native and exotic species with regard to the services they provided. We then chose nine species differing in life form. Plant root system architecture, root mechanical and physiological traits were then measured at two adjacent field sites. One site was highly unstable, with severe soil slippage and erosion. The second site had been replanted 8 years previously and appeared to be physically stable. How root traits differed between sites, season, depth in soil and distance from the plant stem were determined. Root system morphology was analysed by considering architectural traits (root angle, depth, diameter and volume) both up- and downslope. Significant differences between all factors were found, depending on species. We estimated the most useful architectural and mechanical traits for physically fixing soil in place. We then combined these results with those concerning root physiological traits, which were used as a proxy for root metabolic activity. Scores were assigned to each species based on traits. No one species possessed a suite of highly desirable traits, therefore mixtures of species should be used on vulnerable slopes. We also propose a conceptual model describing how to position plants on an unstable site, based on root system traits.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus