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The eCollaborative: using a quality improvement collaborative to implement the National eHealth Record System in Australian primary care practices.

Knight AW, Szucs C, Dhillon M, Lembke T, Mitchell C - Int J Qual Health Care (2014)

Bottom Line: The collaborative methodology was adapted for implementing innovation and proved useful for engaging with multiple small practices, facilitating low-risk testing of processes, sharing ideas among participants, development of clinical champions and development of resources to support wider use.Data quality was a key challenge for this innovation, and quality measures chosen require development.Patient participants were partners in improvement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of NSW, Fairfield, NSW, Australia The Improvement Foundation, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

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Outline of collaborative programme.
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MZU059F1: Outline of collaborative programme.

Mentions: Small practice teams completed a series of three webinars alternating with two face-to-face national workshops (see Fig. 1). Between workshops, teams returned to their practices for activity periods implementing the change principles they had learnt. Practices used plan/do/study/act (PDSA) cycles to test and refine the changes that they made.Figure 1


The eCollaborative: using a quality improvement collaborative to implement the National eHealth Record System in Australian primary care practices.

Knight AW, Szucs C, Dhillon M, Lembke T, Mitchell C - Int J Qual Health Care (2014)

Outline of collaborative programme.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126615&req=5

MZU059F1: Outline of collaborative programme.
Mentions: Small practice teams completed a series of three webinars alternating with two face-to-face national workshops (see Fig. 1). Between workshops, teams returned to their practices for activity periods implementing the change principles they had learnt. Practices used plan/do/study/act (PDSA) cycles to test and refine the changes that they made.Figure 1

Bottom Line: The collaborative methodology was adapted for implementing innovation and proved useful for engaging with multiple small practices, facilitating low-risk testing of processes, sharing ideas among participants, development of clinical champions and development of resources to support wider use.Data quality was a key challenge for this innovation, and quality measures chosen require development.Patient participants were partners in improvement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of NSW, Fairfield, NSW, Australia The Improvement Foundation, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Show MeSH