Limits...
A dynamic model for delta rhythm fit to high-frequency cortical activity data shows discrete functional connectivity in mouse cortex

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A (left) the dependence of change in voltage on previous voltage is identical for all cortical regions; time in past is represented on the x-axis. B (right). The estimated functional connectivity from the right top surface of mouse cortex into the parietal association area: red represents high connectivity; green zero; blue negative.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126567&req=5

Figure 1: A (left) the dependence of change in voltage on previous voltage is identical for all cortical regions; time in past is represented on the x-axis. B (right). The estimated functional connectivity from the right top surface of mouse cortex into the parietal association area: red represents high connectivity; green zero; blue negative.

Mentions: We have generated high-resolution data on neural activity over most of one hemisphere of mouse cortex by voltage-sensitive dyes, in both anesthetized and awake animals. In previous work [1] we have analyzed relations between activity measures at different locations in terms of correlations. Here we fit these data to a predictive model, in which we attempt to predict the next change in activity at every point on cortex from the current pattern of activity over cortex. We fit both linear and non-linear models, whose parameters represent the intrinsic dynamics of local cortical regions and the inputs from distal regions. We find that all regions of mouse cortex appear to have virtually identical patterns of intrinsic dynamics (Figure 1A). We find that even a simple linear fit gives surprisingly sparse patterns of inferred connectivity. Where we have clear anatomical information, these fitted patterns appear to match known anatomy. Furthermore this fit can be used to identify the most prominent functional inputs into anatomically diffusely-connected areas such as the parietal association area (Figure 1B).


A dynamic model for delta rhythm fit to high-frequency cortical activity data shows discrete functional connectivity in mouse cortex
A (left) the dependence of change in voltage on previous voltage is identical for all cortical regions; time in past is represented on the x-axis. B (right). The estimated functional connectivity from the right top surface of mouse cortex into the parietal association area: red represents high connectivity; green zero; blue negative.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126567&req=5

Figure 1: A (left) the dependence of change in voltage on previous voltage is identical for all cortical regions; time in past is represented on the x-axis. B (right). The estimated functional connectivity from the right top surface of mouse cortex into the parietal association area: red represents high connectivity; green zero; blue negative.
Mentions: We have generated high-resolution data on neural activity over most of one hemisphere of mouse cortex by voltage-sensitive dyes, in both anesthetized and awake animals. In previous work [1] we have analyzed relations between activity measures at different locations in terms of correlations. Here we fit these data to a predictive model, in which we attempt to predict the next change in activity at every point on cortex from the current pattern of activity over cortex. We fit both linear and non-linear models, whose parameters represent the intrinsic dynamics of local cortical regions and the inputs from distal regions. We find that all regions of mouse cortex appear to have virtually identical patterns of intrinsic dynamics (Figure 1A). We find that even a simple linear fit gives surprisingly sparse patterns of inferred connectivity. Where we have clear anatomical information, these fitted patterns appear to match known anatomy. Furthermore this fit can be used to identify the most prominent functional inputs into anatomically diffusely-connected areas such as the parietal association area (Figure 1B).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus