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Mathematical modeling and analysis of spinal circuits involved in locomotor pattern generation and frequency-dependent left-right coordination

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Model schematic.
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Figure 1: Model schematic.

Mentions: To analyze and explain the above findings, we developed a simplified mathematical model of neural circuits consisted of four pacemaker neurons representing left (LF) and right (RF) flexor and left (LE) and right (RE) extensor half-centers interacting via commissural pathways representing V3, V0D, and V0V CINs (Fig. 1). The “locomotor” frequency in the model was controlled by a parameter defining the excitability of neurons (via the leak reversal potentials) and commissural pathways, whose changes represented the corresponding changes induced by changing the concentration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) applied to control the locomotor frequency in the isolated rodent spinal cord preparations [1].


Mathematical modeling and analysis of spinal circuits involved in locomotor pattern generation and frequency-dependent left-right coordination
Model schematic.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126505&req=5

Figure 1: Model schematic.
Mentions: To analyze and explain the above findings, we developed a simplified mathematical model of neural circuits consisted of four pacemaker neurons representing left (LF) and right (RF) flexor and left (LE) and right (RE) extensor half-centers interacting via commissural pathways representing V3, V0D, and V0V CINs (Fig. 1). The “locomotor” frequency in the model was controlled by a parameter defining the excitability of neurons (via the leak reversal potentials) and commissural pathways, whose changes represented the corresponding changes induced by changing the concentration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) applied to control the locomotor frequency in the isolated rodent spinal cord preparations [1].

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

No MeSH data available.