Limits...
Super-resolution molecular and functional imaging of nanoscale architectures in life and materials science.

Habuchi S - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2014)

Bottom Line: Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems.I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging.These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology , Jeddah , Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various SR fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Super-resolution imaging of optical properties of nanoscale architectures. (A) Super-resolution imaging of local electromagnetic field enhancement. (Left) principle of Brownian motion super-resolution imaging; (right) super-resolution image of a hotspot on the surface of an aluminum film (Cang et al., 2011). (B) Super-resolution image of SERS signal of rhodamine 6G dyes adsorbed at gap between two silver nanoparticles. Overlay of the SERS spatial intensity map (colored pixels) and luminescent centroid (white ×) with an SEM image of silver nanoparticle aggregate (Weber et al., 2012). (C) (Left) schematic illustration nanoscale photophysical processes occurring in a single conjugated polymer molecule. (Right) 2D spatial map of emitting sites within a single conjugate polymer chain; reproduced with permission from Cang et al. (2011), copyright 2011, Nature Publishing Group (A), Weber et al. (2012), copyright 2012, American Chemical Society (B), Habuchi et al. (2011), copyright 2011, PCCP Owner Societies (C).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126472&req=5

Figure 6: Super-resolution imaging of optical properties of nanoscale architectures. (A) Super-resolution imaging of local electromagnetic field enhancement. (Left) principle of Brownian motion super-resolution imaging; (right) super-resolution image of a hotspot on the surface of an aluminum film (Cang et al., 2011). (B) Super-resolution image of SERS signal of rhodamine 6G dyes adsorbed at gap between two silver nanoparticles. Overlay of the SERS spatial intensity map (colored pixels) and luminescent centroid (white ×) with an SEM image of silver nanoparticle aggregate (Weber et al., 2012). (C) (Left) schematic illustration nanoscale photophysical processes occurring in a single conjugated polymer molecule. (Right) 2D spatial map of emitting sites within a single conjugate polymer chain; reproduced with permission from Cang et al. (2011), copyright 2011, Nature Publishing Group (A), Weber et al. (2012), copyright 2012, American Chemical Society (B), Habuchi et al. (2011), copyright 2011, PCCP Owner Societies (C).

Mentions: An electromagnetic field near metallic nanostructures is enhanced significantly through localized surface plasmon resonance. This phenomenon has been used extensively for chemical and biological sensing as well as for the development of plasmonic optics. While plasmonic hotspots, such as nanoscale gaps and protrusions, are responsible for the enhancement of the local electromagnetic field, it has been difficult to visualize these hotspots directly because nanometer scale spatial resolution is required. SR localization microscopy offers the unique possibility of visualizing a hotspot through measuring the hotspot-induced fluorescence intensity enhancement (Cang et al., 2011; Lin et al., 2012b; Wei et al., 2013). In these studies, the enhancement of the local electromagnetic field was quantified by a precise localization of the positions of freely diffusing fluorophores near the hotspots along with the quantitative analysis of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores. This allows visualization of the size and shape of the hotspots, as well as the electromagnetic field enhancement within the single hotspot (Figure 6A). Hotspots on an aluminum film have been visualized using this method (Figure 6A) (Cang et al., 2011). A similar approach has been used to visualize hotspots in the gap regions between silver nanoparticle aggregates (Figure 6B). In this study, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals of adsorbed organic dye molecules were used to visualize the hotspots (colored pixels in Figure 6B) (Weber et al., 2012). The spatial locations of the hotspots showed a deviation from the luminescence center of the aggregates, which clearly demonstrated the gap-induced enhancement of the electromagnetic field.


Super-resolution molecular and functional imaging of nanoscale architectures in life and materials science.

Habuchi S - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2014)

Super-resolution imaging of optical properties of nanoscale architectures. (A) Super-resolution imaging of local electromagnetic field enhancement. (Left) principle of Brownian motion super-resolution imaging; (right) super-resolution image of a hotspot on the surface of an aluminum film (Cang et al., 2011). (B) Super-resolution image of SERS signal of rhodamine 6G dyes adsorbed at gap between two silver nanoparticles. Overlay of the SERS spatial intensity map (colored pixels) and luminescent centroid (white ×) with an SEM image of silver nanoparticle aggregate (Weber et al., 2012). (C) (Left) schematic illustration nanoscale photophysical processes occurring in a single conjugated polymer molecule. (Right) 2D spatial map of emitting sites within a single conjugate polymer chain; reproduced with permission from Cang et al. (2011), copyright 2011, Nature Publishing Group (A), Weber et al. (2012), copyright 2012, American Chemical Society (B), Habuchi et al. (2011), copyright 2011, PCCP Owner Societies (C).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126472&req=5

Figure 6: Super-resolution imaging of optical properties of nanoscale architectures. (A) Super-resolution imaging of local electromagnetic field enhancement. (Left) principle of Brownian motion super-resolution imaging; (right) super-resolution image of a hotspot on the surface of an aluminum film (Cang et al., 2011). (B) Super-resolution image of SERS signal of rhodamine 6G dyes adsorbed at gap between two silver nanoparticles. Overlay of the SERS spatial intensity map (colored pixels) and luminescent centroid (white ×) with an SEM image of silver nanoparticle aggregate (Weber et al., 2012). (C) (Left) schematic illustration nanoscale photophysical processes occurring in a single conjugated polymer molecule. (Right) 2D spatial map of emitting sites within a single conjugate polymer chain; reproduced with permission from Cang et al. (2011), copyright 2011, Nature Publishing Group (A), Weber et al. (2012), copyright 2012, American Chemical Society (B), Habuchi et al. (2011), copyright 2011, PCCP Owner Societies (C).
Mentions: An electromagnetic field near metallic nanostructures is enhanced significantly through localized surface plasmon resonance. This phenomenon has been used extensively for chemical and biological sensing as well as for the development of plasmonic optics. While plasmonic hotspots, such as nanoscale gaps and protrusions, are responsible for the enhancement of the local electromagnetic field, it has been difficult to visualize these hotspots directly because nanometer scale spatial resolution is required. SR localization microscopy offers the unique possibility of visualizing a hotspot through measuring the hotspot-induced fluorescence intensity enhancement (Cang et al., 2011; Lin et al., 2012b; Wei et al., 2013). In these studies, the enhancement of the local electromagnetic field was quantified by a precise localization of the positions of freely diffusing fluorophores near the hotspots along with the quantitative analysis of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores. This allows visualization of the size and shape of the hotspots, as well as the electromagnetic field enhancement within the single hotspot (Figure 6A). Hotspots on an aluminum film have been visualized using this method (Figure 6A) (Cang et al., 2011). A similar approach has been used to visualize hotspots in the gap regions between silver nanoparticle aggregates (Figure 6B). In this study, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals of adsorbed organic dye molecules were used to visualize the hotspots (colored pixels in Figure 6B) (Weber et al., 2012). The spatial locations of the hotspots showed a deviation from the luminescence center of the aggregates, which clearly demonstrated the gap-induced enhancement of the electromagnetic field.

Bottom Line: Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems.I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging.These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology , Jeddah , Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various SR fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus