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Super-resolution molecular and functional imaging of nanoscale architectures in life and materials science.

Habuchi S - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2014)

Bottom Line: Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems.I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging.These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology , Jeddah , Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various SR fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

No MeSH data available.


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Super-resolution fluorescence imaging of catalytic reactions. (A) (Left) schematic illustration of the strategy for monitoring individual epoxidation reaction events catalyzed by mesoporous titanosilicates, Ti-MCM-41. The active sites are fluorescently visualized and localized by the catalytic reaction-induced color conversion of the fluorophore; (right) localization microscopy image of individual turnover. The red dots show positions of fluorescent spots originating from individual product molecules (De Cremer et al., 2010). (B) Super-resolution imaging of deacetylation reaction catalyzed by Au@mSiO2 nanorod. The positions of the reaction product on the nanorod are visualized by localization microscopy and plotted in the 2D histogram, which shows the position-dependent catalytic activity (Zhou et al., 2012). Reproduced with permission from De Cremer et al. (2010), copyright 2010, Wiley (A), and Zhou et al. (2012), copyright 2012, Nature Publishing Group (B).
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Figure 5: Super-resolution fluorescence imaging of catalytic reactions. (A) (Left) schematic illustration of the strategy for monitoring individual epoxidation reaction events catalyzed by mesoporous titanosilicates, Ti-MCM-41. The active sites are fluorescently visualized and localized by the catalytic reaction-induced color conversion of the fluorophore; (right) localization microscopy image of individual turnover. The red dots show positions of fluorescent spots originating from individual product molecules (De Cremer et al., 2010). (B) Super-resolution imaging of deacetylation reaction catalyzed by Au@mSiO2 nanorod. The positions of the reaction product on the nanorod are visualized by localization microscopy and plotted in the 2D histogram, which shows the position-dependent catalytic activity (Zhou et al., 2012). Reproduced with permission from De Cremer et al. (2010), copyright 2010, Wiley (A), and Zhou et al. (2012), copyright 2012, Nature Publishing Group (B).

Mentions: The catalytic activity of solid catalysts is governed by their nanoscale structural heterogeneities. However, a lack of appropriate methodology had hampered attempts to connect the activity with the nanoscale structure of the catalysts. Recent studies have demonstrated that the active sites of catalytic reactions can be visualized at a spatial resolution of tens of nanometers using SR localization microscopy (Roeffaers et al., 2007). In these studies, the spatial locations of the active sites are determined by localizing fluorescent molecules generated by the catalytic reaction (Figure 5A). The SR catalytic activity imaging revealed that mesoporous particles such as zeolite (Roeffaers et al., 2009) and titanosilicate Ti-MCM-41 (De Cremer et al., 2010) show catalytic activity only at the surface of the particles due to the limited access of the substrate molecules to the catalytic sites inside the particles (Figure 5A). Heterogeneous catalytic activity on the surface of the gold nanorod catalyst has also been reported (Figure 5B) (Zhou et al., 2012; Andoy et al., 2013). The catalytic activity of carbon nanotubes (Xu et al., 2009) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (Tachikawa et al., 2013) has also been characterized by SR fluorescence microscopy.


Super-resolution molecular and functional imaging of nanoscale architectures in life and materials science.

Habuchi S - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2014)

Super-resolution fluorescence imaging of catalytic reactions. (A) (Left) schematic illustration of the strategy for monitoring individual epoxidation reaction events catalyzed by mesoporous titanosilicates, Ti-MCM-41. The active sites are fluorescently visualized and localized by the catalytic reaction-induced color conversion of the fluorophore; (right) localization microscopy image of individual turnover. The red dots show positions of fluorescent spots originating from individual product molecules (De Cremer et al., 2010). (B) Super-resolution imaging of deacetylation reaction catalyzed by Au@mSiO2 nanorod. The positions of the reaction product on the nanorod are visualized by localization microscopy and plotted in the 2D histogram, which shows the position-dependent catalytic activity (Zhou et al., 2012). Reproduced with permission from De Cremer et al. (2010), copyright 2010, Wiley (A), and Zhou et al. (2012), copyright 2012, Nature Publishing Group (B).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126472&req=5

Figure 5: Super-resolution fluorescence imaging of catalytic reactions. (A) (Left) schematic illustration of the strategy for monitoring individual epoxidation reaction events catalyzed by mesoporous titanosilicates, Ti-MCM-41. The active sites are fluorescently visualized and localized by the catalytic reaction-induced color conversion of the fluorophore; (right) localization microscopy image of individual turnover. The red dots show positions of fluorescent spots originating from individual product molecules (De Cremer et al., 2010). (B) Super-resolution imaging of deacetylation reaction catalyzed by Au@mSiO2 nanorod. The positions of the reaction product on the nanorod are visualized by localization microscopy and plotted in the 2D histogram, which shows the position-dependent catalytic activity (Zhou et al., 2012). Reproduced with permission from De Cremer et al. (2010), copyright 2010, Wiley (A), and Zhou et al. (2012), copyright 2012, Nature Publishing Group (B).
Mentions: The catalytic activity of solid catalysts is governed by their nanoscale structural heterogeneities. However, a lack of appropriate methodology had hampered attempts to connect the activity with the nanoscale structure of the catalysts. Recent studies have demonstrated that the active sites of catalytic reactions can be visualized at a spatial resolution of tens of nanometers using SR localization microscopy (Roeffaers et al., 2007). In these studies, the spatial locations of the active sites are determined by localizing fluorescent molecules generated by the catalytic reaction (Figure 5A). The SR catalytic activity imaging revealed that mesoporous particles such as zeolite (Roeffaers et al., 2009) and titanosilicate Ti-MCM-41 (De Cremer et al., 2010) show catalytic activity only at the surface of the particles due to the limited access of the substrate molecules to the catalytic sites inside the particles (Figure 5A). Heterogeneous catalytic activity on the surface of the gold nanorod catalyst has also been reported (Figure 5B) (Zhou et al., 2012; Andoy et al., 2013). The catalytic activity of carbon nanotubes (Xu et al., 2009) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (Tachikawa et al., 2013) has also been characterized by SR fluorescence microscopy.

Bottom Line: Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems.I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging.These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology , Jeddah , Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various SR fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus