Limits...
Super-resolution molecular and functional imaging of nanoscale architectures in life and materials science.

Habuchi S - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2014)

Bottom Line: Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems.I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging.These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology , Jeddah , Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various SR fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

No MeSH data available.


Scheme of the switching of fluorescence states for super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy. (A) Photo-induced switching, (B) photo-induced redox switching, (C) selective adsorption, (D) photo- and thermal-induced switching, and (E) chemical or enzymatic reaction-induced switching.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126472&req=5

Figure 2: Scheme of the switching of fluorescence states for super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy. (A) Photo-induced switching, (B) photo-induced redox switching, (C) selective adsorption, (D) photo- and thermal-induced switching, and (E) chemical or enzymatic reaction-induced switching.

Mentions: Temporal control of the fluorescent state has become possible with the development of photoswitchable molecules (Figure 2A). Photoactivation (i.e., switching from an off-state to an on-state upon illumination at a specific wavelength), photoswitching (i.e., reversible switching between an on-state and an off-state upon illumination at two different wavelengths), and photoconversion (i.e., conversion of fluorescent state from one color to another upon illumination at a specific wavelength) have been the most widely used strategies for the temporal control of the fluorescent states of the probe molecules. Fluorescent proteins for which the fluorescent properties can be switched by light illumination have been studied extensively (Nienhaus and Nienhaus, 2014), these proteins having been designed originally for fluorescence-based optical highlighting (Patterson, 2011). A variety of photoswitchable proteins (Ando et al., 2004; Habuchi et al., 2005; Egner et al., 2007; Flors et al., 2007; Andresen et al., 2008; Stiel et al., 2008; Brakemann et al., 2011), photoactivatable proteins (Patterson and Lippincott-Schwartz, 2002; Subach et al., 2009, 2010; Gunewardene et al., 2011), and photoconvertable proteins (Ando et al., 2002; Wiedenmann et al., 2004; Habuchi et al., 2008; McKinney et al., 2009; Subach et al., 2011; McEvoy et al., 2012; Moeyaert et al., 2014) have been designed for the localization microscopy. Fluorescent proteins, which show both photoactivation and photoconversion (Fuchs et al., 2010), such as Iris FP (Adam et al., 2008) and NijiFP (Adam et al., 2011), have also been designed for SR pulse-chase imaging. Photochromic dyes are well-known as photoswitchable molecules (Irie et al., 2002), and have been used as fluorescent probes for localization microscopy (Folling et al., 2007).


Super-resolution molecular and functional imaging of nanoscale architectures in life and materials science.

Habuchi S - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2014)

Scheme of the switching of fluorescence states for super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy. (A) Photo-induced switching, (B) photo-induced redox switching, (C) selective adsorption, (D) photo- and thermal-induced switching, and (E) chemical or enzymatic reaction-induced switching.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126472&req=5

Figure 2: Scheme of the switching of fluorescence states for super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy. (A) Photo-induced switching, (B) photo-induced redox switching, (C) selective adsorption, (D) photo- and thermal-induced switching, and (E) chemical or enzymatic reaction-induced switching.
Mentions: Temporal control of the fluorescent state has become possible with the development of photoswitchable molecules (Figure 2A). Photoactivation (i.e., switching from an off-state to an on-state upon illumination at a specific wavelength), photoswitching (i.e., reversible switching between an on-state and an off-state upon illumination at two different wavelengths), and photoconversion (i.e., conversion of fluorescent state from one color to another upon illumination at a specific wavelength) have been the most widely used strategies for the temporal control of the fluorescent states of the probe molecules. Fluorescent proteins for which the fluorescent properties can be switched by light illumination have been studied extensively (Nienhaus and Nienhaus, 2014), these proteins having been designed originally for fluorescence-based optical highlighting (Patterson, 2011). A variety of photoswitchable proteins (Ando et al., 2004; Habuchi et al., 2005; Egner et al., 2007; Flors et al., 2007; Andresen et al., 2008; Stiel et al., 2008; Brakemann et al., 2011), photoactivatable proteins (Patterson and Lippincott-Schwartz, 2002; Subach et al., 2009, 2010; Gunewardene et al., 2011), and photoconvertable proteins (Ando et al., 2002; Wiedenmann et al., 2004; Habuchi et al., 2008; McKinney et al., 2009; Subach et al., 2011; McEvoy et al., 2012; Moeyaert et al., 2014) have been designed for the localization microscopy. Fluorescent proteins, which show both photoactivation and photoconversion (Fuchs et al., 2010), such as Iris FP (Adam et al., 2008) and NijiFP (Adam et al., 2011), have also been designed for SR pulse-chase imaging. Photochromic dyes are well-known as photoswitchable molecules (Irie et al., 2002), and have been used as fluorescent probes for localization microscopy (Folling et al., 2007).

Bottom Line: Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems.I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging.These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology , Jeddah , Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various SR fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

No MeSH data available.