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Development of avalanches and efficient communication in neuronal networks

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Avalanches and information transfer over the course of neuronal development. A. Distribution of spikes per avalanche (28 days in vitro), with time-bins of different durations. B. Gradual decrease in the slope of best-fitting power law during development. C. Alteration in the distribution of transfer entropy over development. D. Network efficiency in artificial data derived from power laws with different scaling exponents (α) and densities (d).
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Figure 1: Avalanches and information transfer over the course of neuronal development. A. Distribution of spikes per avalanche (28 days in vitro), with time-bins of different durations. B. Gradual decrease in the slope of best-fitting power law during development. C. Alteration in the distribution of transfer entropy over development. D. Network efficiency in artificial data derived from power laws with different scaling exponents (α) and densities (d).

Mentions: Over the course of neural development, changes in the morphology of the neural tissue are accompanied by changes in patterns of activity. One form of activity that is highly studied in cultured cortical networks is neuronal avalanches, characterized by bursts whose distribution follows a power law. Despite a detailed characterization of neuronal avalanches, much remains unknown about their gradual emergence during development [1]. Here, we examined 643,039 avalanches in 15 cortical cultures grown to 35 days in vitro on microelectrode arrays. We employed maximum likelihood estimation to evaluate the fit of a power law to the duration and amplitude of avalanches at different points during development (Figure 1A). The slope of the best-fitting power law followed a gradual trend from α≈2.3 in early recordings to α≈1.5 around 25 days in vitro (Figure 1B).


Development of avalanches and efficient communication in neuronal networks
Avalanches and information transfer over the course of neuronal development. A. Distribution of spikes per avalanche (28 days in vitro), with time-bins of different durations. B. Gradual decrease in the slope of best-fitting power law during development. C. Alteration in the distribution of transfer entropy over development. D. Network efficiency in artificial data derived from power laws with different scaling exponents (α) and densities (d).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126459&req=5

Figure 1: Avalanches and information transfer over the course of neuronal development. A. Distribution of spikes per avalanche (28 days in vitro), with time-bins of different durations. B. Gradual decrease in the slope of best-fitting power law during development. C. Alteration in the distribution of transfer entropy over development. D. Network efficiency in artificial data derived from power laws with different scaling exponents (α) and densities (d).
Mentions: Over the course of neural development, changes in the morphology of the neural tissue are accompanied by changes in patterns of activity. One form of activity that is highly studied in cultured cortical networks is neuronal avalanches, characterized by bursts whose distribution follows a power law. Despite a detailed characterization of neuronal avalanches, much remains unknown about their gradual emergence during development [1]. Here, we examined 643,039 avalanches in 15 cortical cultures grown to 35 days in vitro on microelectrode arrays. We employed maximum likelihood estimation to evaluate the fit of a power law to the duration and amplitude of avalanches at different points during development (Figure 1A). The slope of the best-fitting power law followed a gradual trend from α≈2.3 in early recordings to α≈1.5 around 25 days in vitro (Figure 1B).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

No MeSH data available.