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A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test.

Herreros I, Giovannucci A, Taub AH, Hogri R, Magal A, Bamford S, Prueckl R, Verschure PF - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2014)

Bottom Line: As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response.The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region.These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Synthetic Perceptive, Emotive and Cognitive Systems group (SPECS), Universitat Pompeu Fabra , Barcelona , Spain.

ABSTRACT
Emulating the input-output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model's inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fluctuations in the spontaneous IO rate. Mean IO rate in each trial of the experiment. The horizontal dotted line marks the 1.14 Hz level of activity. The vertical dashed line marks the transition from acquisition to extinction trials.
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Figure 14: Fluctuations in the spontaneous IO rate. Mean IO rate in each trial of the experiment. The horizontal dotted line marks the 1.14 Hz level of activity. The vertical dashed line marks the transition from acquisition to extinction trials.

Mentions: Second, our calibration of the cerebellar model assumes that the level of spontaneous activity in the IO remains constant. If the IO spontaneous activity significantly deviates from the one estimated during calibration, then w will drift, eventually leading to either acquisition or extinction. Since during the conditioning experiment we observed that the spontaneous activity fluctuated (Figure 14), there is the possibility that the behavior observed did not result from associative learning but from changes in w due to oscillations in the IO spontaneous activity. In particular, given that the IO spontaneous activity increased during acquisition and decreased during extinction, such fluctuations might have caused or favored the behavioral result.


A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test.

Herreros I, Giovannucci A, Taub AH, Hogri R, Magal A, Bamford S, Prueckl R, Verschure PF - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2014)

Fluctuations in the spontaneous IO rate. Mean IO rate in each trial of the experiment. The horizontal dotted line marks the 1.14 Hz level of activity. The vertical dashed line marks the transition from acquisition to extinction trials.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126458&req=5

Figure 14: Fluctuations in the spontaneous IO rate. Mean IO rate in each trial of the experiment. The horizontal dotted line marks the 1.14 Hz level of activity. The vertical dashed line marks the transition from acquisition to extinction trials.
Mentions: Second, our calibration of the cerebellar model assumes that the level of spontaneous activity in the IO remains constant. If the IO spontaneous activity significantly deviates from the one estimated during calibration, then w will drift, eventually leading to either acquisition or extinction. Since during the conditioning experiment we observed that the spontaneous activity fluctuated (Figure 14), there is the possibility that the behavior observed did not result from associative learning but from changes in w due to oscillations in the IO spontaneous activity. In particular, given that the IO spontaneous activity increased during acquisition and decreased during extinction, such fluctuations might have caused or favored the behavioral result.

Bottom Line: As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response.The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region.These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Synthetic Perceptive, Emotive and Cognitive Systems group (SPECS), Universitat Pompeu Fabra , Barcelona , Spain.

ABSTRACT
Emulating the input-output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model's inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus