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Diagnostic value of gastric shake test for hyaline membrane disease in preterm infant.

NooriShadkam M, Lookzadeh MH, Taghizadeh M, Golzar A, NooriShadkam Z - Iran J Reprod Med (2014)

Bottom Line: This was a diagnostic accuracy study carried out on 49 preterm infant born at Shahid Sadoughi hospital in 2012 (25 newborns without pulmonary diseases and 24 newborns with HMD).All infants who developed HMD had negative test results.In 23 of 25 infants with no respiratory distress, the test was positive.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Children Growth Disorder Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hyaline membrane disease (HMD) has remained a common neonatal problem and is a cause of morbidity in infants. The shake test can be used to assess whether surfactant is present in the infant's lungs at birth.

Objective: The goal of this study was to determine the usefulness and accuracy of gastric aspirate shake test for the diagnosis of two HMD.

Materials and methods: This was a diagnostic accuracy study carried out on 49 preterm infant born at Shahid Sadoughi hospital in 2012 (25 newborns without pulmonary diseases and 24 newborns with HMD). Shortly after birth, the shake test was performed using gastric fluid. The results of the shake test were correlated with definitive diagnosis of HMD.

Results: All infants who developed HMD had negative test results. In 23 of 25 infants with no respiratory distress, the test was positive. Our findings indicated that the gastric aspirate shake test has 100% sensitivity, 92% specificity, a 92.3% predictive value for surfactant deficiency, and 100% predictive value for surfactant sufficiency.

Conclusion: According to this study gastric shake test (GST) is a reliable test and is a simple procedure to identify those neonates who will develop respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and therefore to decide prophylactic exogenous surfactant replacement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic diagram showing interpretations of gastric aspirate shake test
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Figure 1: Schematic diagram showing interpretations of gastric aspirate shake test

Mentions: From all babies 0.5 ml of gastric fluid was obtained within 20 min of birth then mixed with an equal volume of normal saline for15 sec; 1 ml of 95% ethanol was then added and the mixture agitated for 15 sec. After standing for 15 min, the air-liquid interface was examined for bubbles. If no bubbles are present then the test is NEGATIVE (very little surfactant is present). If bubbles are present right across the surface of the fluid, then the test is POSITIVE (adequate amounts of surfactant). (Figure 1). After the shake test the samples were divided into two groups: 1) The first group received surfactant as soon as possible based on hyaline membrane disease symptoms, Silverman Anderson retraction score>6, or radiological findings typical of RDS. 2) The second group of infants in the control group, which includes premature infants less than 34 weeks, without RDS and in no respiratory distress.


Diagnostic value of gastric shake test for hyaline membrane disease in preterm infant.

NooriShadkam M, Lookzadeh MH, Taghizadeh M, Golzar A, NooriShadkam Z - Iran J Reprod Med (2014)

Schematic diagram showing interpretations of gastric aspirate shake test
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126253&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic diagram showing interpretations of gastric aspirate shake test
Mentions: From all babies 0.5 ml of gastric fluid was obtained within 20 min of birth then mixed with an equal volume of normal saline for15 sec; 1 ml of 95% ethanol was then added and the mixture agitated for 15 sec. After standing for 15 min, the air-liquid interface was examined for bubbles. If no bubbles are present then the test is NEGATIVE (very little surfactant is present). If bubbles are present right across the surface of the fluid, then the test is POSITIVE (adequate amounts of surfactant). (Figure 1). After the shake test the samples were divided into two groups: 1) The first group received surfactant as soon as possible based on hyaline membrane disease symptoms, Silverman Anderson retraction score>6, or radiological findings typical of RDS. 2) The second group of infants in the control group, which includes premature infants less than 34 weeks, without RDS and in no respiratory distress.

Bottom Line: This was a diagnostic accuracy study carried out on 49 preterm infant born at Shahid Sadoughi hospital in 2012 (25 newborns without pulmonary diseases and 24 newborns with HMD).All infants who developed HMD had negative test results.In 23 of 25 infants with no respiratory distress, the test was positive.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Children Growth Disorder Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hyaline membrane disease (HMD) has remained a common neonatal problem and is a cause of morbidity in infants. The shake test can be used to assess whether surfactant is present in the infant's lungs at birth.

Objective: The goal of this study was to determine the usefulness and accuracy of gastric aspirate shake test for the diagnosis of two HMD.

Materials and methods: This was a diagnostic accuracy study carried out on 49 preterm infant born at Shahid Sadoughi hospital in 2012 (25 newborns without pulmonary diseases and 24 newborns with HMD). Shortly after birth, the shake test was performed using gastric fluid. The results of the shake test were correlated with definitive diagnosis of HMD.

Results: All infants who developed HMD had negative test results. In 23 of 25 infants with no respiratory distress, the test was positive. Our findings indicated that the gastric aspirate shake test has 100% sensitivity, 92% specificity, a 92.3% predictive value for surfactant deficiency, and 100% predictive value for surfactant sufficiency.

Conclusion: According to this study gastric shake test (GST) is a reliable test and is a simple procedure to identify those neonates who will develop respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and therefore to decide prophylactic exogenous surfactant replacement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus