Limits...
Abnormal repolarization in the acute myocardial infarction patients: a frequency-based characterization.

Giuliani C, Agostinelli A, Fioretti S, Nardo FD, Burattini LB - Open Biomed Eng J (2014)

Bottom Line: Repolarization dispersion caused f99 distributions to be significantly lead dependent.Instead, lead-system analysis, performed to overcome dispersion issues, provided the best results when averaging over the 6 precordial leads (Se= 81% and Sp=74%).In conclusion, our new f99 index appears as a promising tool for non-invasively and reliably discriminate AMI patients from healthy subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Information Engineering, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Despite ST elevation having poor sensitivity for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), it remains the main electrocardiographic (ECG) repolarization index for AMI diagnosis. Aim of the present study was to propose a new f99 index, defined as the frequency at which the repolarization normalized cumulative energy reaches 99%, for ECG AMI discrimination from health with good sensitivity and good specificity. Evaluation of such f99 index was performed on 12-standard-lead (I, II, III, aV1, aVr, aVf, V1 to V6) ECG recordings of 47 healthy controls and 108 acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients. Repolarization dispersion caused f99 distributions to be significantly lead dependent. In most leads (leads I, II, aVl, aVr, V2-V6), f99 median value was lower in the healthy controls (10-17 Hz) than in the AMI patients (12-38 Hz) indicating higher frequency components (i.e. a more fragmented repolarization) in the latter population. AMI patients from healthy controls discrimination by f99, evaluated in terms of sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp), was also lead dependent. Single-lead analysis indicated leads I (Se=80%, Sp=77%) and aVl (Se=84%, Sp=74%) as optimal. Instead, lead-system analysis, performed to overcome dispersion issues, provided the best results when averaging over the 6 precordial leads (Se= 81% and Sp=74%). In conclusion, our new f99 index appears as a promising tool for non-invasively and reliably discriminate AMI patients from healthy subjects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trend of f99 computed from a simulated signal y(t) constituted by the summation of two sinusoids y1(t) and y2(t) characterized by constant frequency values (f1=1 Hz, f2=15 Hz, respectively), constant y1(t) amplitude (A1=1 a.u.) and varying y2(t) amplitude (A2=0-1 a.u.).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126187&req=5

Figure 1: Trend of f99 computed from a simulated signal y(t) constituted by the summation of two sinusoids y1(t) and y2(t) characterized by constant frequency values (f1=1 Hz, f2=15 Hz, respectively), constant y1(t) amplitude (A1=1 a.u.) and varying y2(t) amplitude (A2=0-1 a.u.).

Mentions: Simulation study. In our simulation study, f99 resulted equal to 1 Hz for A2 ranging from 0 to A2*=0.1, and to 15 Hz for higher values of A2 (Fig. 1), confirming the goodness of our f99-algorithm MATLAB implementation.


Abnormal repolarization in the acute myocardial infarction patients: a frequency-based characterization.

Giuliani C, Agostinelli A, Fioretti S, Nardo FD, Burattini LB - Open Biomed Eng J (2014)

Trend of f99 computed from a simulated signal y(t) constituted by the summation of two sinusoids y1(t) and y2(t) characterized by constant frequency values (f1=1 Hz, f2=15 Hz, respectively), constant y1(t) amplitude (A1=1 a.u.) and varying y2(t) amplitude (A2=0-1 a.u.).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126187&req=5

Figure 1: Trend of f99 computed from a simulated signal y(t) constituted by the summation of two sinusoids y1(t) and y2(t) characterized by constant frequency values (f1=1 Hz, f2=15 Hz, respectively), constant y1(t) amplitude (A1=1 a.u.) and varying y2(t) amplitude (A2=0-1 a.u.).
Mentions: Simulation study. In our simulation study, f99 resulted equal to 1 Hz for A2 ranging from 0 to A2*=0.1, and to 15 Hz for higher values of A2 (Fig. 1), confirming the goodness of our f99-algorithm MATLAB implementation.

Bottom Line: Repolarization dispersion caused f99 distributions to be significantly lead dependent.Instead, lead-system analysis, performed to overcome dispersion issues, provided the best results when averaging over the 6 precordial leads (Se= 81% and Sp=74%).In conclusion, our new f99 index appears as a promising tool for non-invasively and reliably discriminate AMI patients from healthy subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Information Engineering, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Despite ST elevation having poor sensitivity for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), it remains the main electrocardiographic (ECG) repolarization index for AMI diagnosis. Aim of the present study was to propose a new f99 index, defined as the frequency at which the repolarization normalized cumulative energy reaches 99%, for ECG AMI discrimination from health with good sensitivity and good specificity. Evaluation of such f99 index was performed on 12-standard-lead (I, II, III, aV1, aVr, aVf, V1 to V6) ECG recordings of 47 healthy controls and 108 acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients. Repolarization dispersion caused f99 distributions to be significantly lead dependent. In most leads (leads I, II, aVl, aVr, V2-V6), f99 median value was lower in the healthy controls (10-17 Hz) than in the AMI patients (12-38 Hz) indicating higher frequency components (i.e. a more fragmented repolarization) in the latter population. AMI patients from healthy controls discrimination by f99, evaluated in terms of sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp), was also lead dependent. Single-lead analysis indicated leads I (Se=80%, Sp=77%) and aVl (Se=84%, Sp=74%) as optimal. Instead, lead-system analysis, performed to overcome dispersion issues, provided the best results when averaging over the 6 precordial leads (Se= 81% and Sp=74%). In conclusion, our new f99 index appears as a promising tool for non-invasively and reliably discriminate AMI patients from healthy subjects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus