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Antral follicle count in normal (fertility-proven) and infertile Indian women.

Agarwal A, Verma A, Agarwal S, Shukla RC, Jain M, Srivastava A - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: Thirty patients undergoing workup for infertility were included and compared to equal number of controls (women with proven fertility).Comparison of the data recorded for cases and controls showed no significant difference in the mean ovarian volume.Baseline and cut-off values in Indian women are lower than that mentioned in the Western literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Antral follicle count (AFC) has been labeled as the most accurate biomarker to assess female fecundity. Unfortunately, no baseline Indian data exists, and we continue using surrogate values from the Western literature (inferred from studies on women, grossly different than Indian women in morphology and genetic makeup).

Aims: (1) To establish the role of AFC as a function of ovarian reserve in fertility-proven and in subfertile Indian women. (2) To establish baseline cut-off AFC values for Indian women.

Settings and design: Prospective observational case-control study.

Materials and methods: Thirty patients undergoing workup for infertility were included and compared to equal number of controls (women with proven fertility). The basal ovarian volume and AFC were measured by endovaginal. USG the relevant clinical data and hormonal assays were charted for every patient.

Statistical analysis used: SPSS platform was used to perform the Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test for intergroup comparisons. Correlations were determined by Pearson's ranked correlation coefficient.

Results: Regression analysis revealed the highest correlation of AFC and age in fertile and infertile patients with difference in mean AFC of both the groups. Comparison of the data recorded for cases and controls showed no significant difference in the mean ovarian volume.

Conclusions: AFC has the closest association with chronological age in normal and infertile Indian women. The same is lower in infertile women than in matched controls. Baseline and cut-off values in Indian women are lower than that mentioned in the Western literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Transvaginal USG of bilateral ovaries, (A) right and (B) left, showing healthy representative antral follicles (straight arrows), counted to assess the antral follicle count. Note the intervening healthy-appearing stroma as well (solid arrow)
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Figure 2: Transvaginal USG of bilateral ovaries, (A) right and (B) left, showing healthy representative antral follicles (straight arrows), counted to assess the antral follicle count. Note the intervening healthy-appearing stroma as well (solid arrow)

Mentions: Mean values of the biophysical and sonographic parameters of subfertile patients and healthy female volunteers are given in Table 1. Significant difference was noted only for AFC, confirming hereby an adequate matching of both groups and exclusion of selection bias. Further, the correlation matrices showed close correlation between various variables in the case group [Table 2 in conjunction with Figure 2] and in the control group [Table 3]. Significance could be ascribed to both the AFC and day-3 FSH results. Both cases and controls showed decline in the AFC with increasing age (P < 0.003 for cases and P < 0.008 for controls) [Figures 3 and 4]. However, no significance could be assigned to TOV in the context of ovarian reserve in the present study. The correlation of AFC with age was strong (r = 0.527) as was the correlation was of day-3 FSH with age, suggesting their role as the best markers of ovarian reserve [Table 2].


Antral follicle count in normal (fertility-proven) and infertile Indian women.

Agarwal A, Verma A, Agarwal S, Shukla RC, Jain M, Srivastava A - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Transvaginal USG of bilateral ovaries, (A) right and (B) left, showing healthy representative antral follicles (straight arrows), counted to assess the antral follicle count. Note the intervening healthy-appearing stroma as well (solid arrow)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126147&req=5

Figure 2: Transvaginal USG of bilateral ovaries, (A) right and (B) left, showing healthy representative antral follicles (straight arrows), counted to assess the antral follicle count. Note the intervening healthy-appearing stroma as well (solid arrow)
Mentions: Mean values of the biophysical and sonographic parameters of subfertile patients and healthy female volunteers are given in Table 1. Significant difference was noted only for AFC, confirming hereby an adequate matching of both groups and exclusion of selection bias. Further, the correlation matrices showed close correlation between various variables in the case group [Table 2 in conjunction with Figure 2] and in the control group [Table 3]. Significance could be ascribed to both the AFC and day-3 FSH results. Both cases and controls showed decline in the AFC with increasing age (P < 0.003 for cases and P < 0.008 for controls) [Figures 3 and 4]. However, no significance could be assigned to TOV in the context of ovarian reserve in the present study. The correlation of AFC with age was strong (r = 0.527) as was the correlation was of day-3 FSH with age, suggesting their role as the best markers of ovarian reserve [Table 2].

Bottom Line: Thirty patients undergoing workup for infertility were included and compared to equal number of controls (women with proven fertility).Comparison of the data recorded for cases and controls showed no significant difference in the mean ovarian volume.Baseline and cut-off values in Indian women are lower than that mentioned in the Western literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Antral follicle count (AFC) has been labeled as the most accurate biomarker to assess female fecundity. Unfortunately, no baseline Indian data exists, and we continue using surrogate values from the Western literature (inferred from studies on women, grossly different than Indian women in morphology and genetic makeup).

Aims: (1) To establish the role of AFC as a function of ovarian reserve in fertility-proven and in subfertile Indian women. (2) To establish baseline cut-off AFC values for Indian women.

Settings and design: Prospective observational case-control study.

Materials and methods: Thirty patients undergoing workup for infertility were included and compared to equal number of controls (women with proven fertility). The basal ovarian volume and AFC were measured by endovaginal. USG the relevant clinical data and hormonal assays were charted for every patient.

Statistical analysis used: SPSS platform was used to perform the Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test for intergroup comparisons. Correlations were determined by Pearson's ranked correlation coefficient.

Results: Regression analysis revealed the highest correlation of AFC and age in fertile and infertile patients with difference in mean AFC of both the groups. Comparison of the data recorded for cases and controls showed no significant difference in the mean ovarian volume.

Conclusions: AFC has the closest association with chronological age in normal and infertile Indian women. The same is lower in infertile women than in matched controls. Baseline and cut-off values in Indian women are lower than that mentioned in the Western literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus