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Imaging of articular cartilage.

Paunipagar BK, Rasalkar D - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: It is frequently exposed to trauma, degeneration, and repetitive wear and tear.MRI has played a vital role in evaluation of articular cartilage.With the availability of advanced repair surgeries for cartilage lesions, there has been an increased demand for improved cartilage imaging techniques.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Imaging Sciences, Global Hospitals, Mumbai, India.

ABSTRACT
We tried to review the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in understanding microscopic and morphologic structure of the articular cartilage. The optimal protocols and available spin-echo sequences in present day practice are reviewed in context of common pathologies of articular cartilage. The future trends of articular cartilage imaging have been discussed with their appropriateness. In diarthrodial joints of the body, articular cartilage is functionally very important. It is frequently exposed to trauma, degeneration, and repetitive wear and tear. MRI has played a vital role in evaluation of articular cartilage. With the availability of advanced repair surgeries for cartilage lesions, there has been an increased demand for improved cartilage imaging techniques. Recent advances in imaging strategies for native and postoperative articular cartilage open up an entirely new approach in management of cartilage-related pathologies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

MRI images depicting grading of articular cartilage lesions based upon Modified Outerbridge classification. Grade 0 (21A, normal articular cartilage), grade 1 (21B, chondral surface fibrilation), grade 2 (21C, partial thickness chondral lesion), grade 3 (21D, full thickness cartilage lesion reaching the bone), grade 4 (21E, full thickness cartilage lesion exposing the subchondral bone)
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Figure 21: MRI images depicting grading of articular cartilage lesions based upon Modified Outerbridge classification. Grade 0 (21A, normal articular cartilage), grade 1 (21B, chondral surface fibrilation), grade 2 (21C, partial thickness chondral lesion), grade 3 (21D, full thickness cartilage lesion reaching the bone), grade 4 (21E, full thickness cartilage lesion exposing the subchondral bone)

Mentions: There are various modifications in MRI protocols and parameters which have been formulated to alter the SNR amongst structures surrounding articular cartilage in relation to cartilage proper, indirectly allowing us to ascertain subtle cartilage-based lesions [Figure 21]. MRA of knee helps to increase sensitivity for cartilage lesions and for detection of intra-articular bodies and their donor sites, but it is also not routinely performed. Indications for MRA include evaluation of articular cartilage.


Imaging of articular cartilage.

Paunipagar BK, Rasalkar D - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

MRI images depicting grading of articular cartilage lesions based upon Modified Outerbridge classification. Grade 0 (21A, normal articular cartilage), grade 1 (21B, chondral surface fibrilation), grade 2 (21C, partial thickness chondral lesion), grade 3 (21D, full thickness cartilage lesion reaching the bone), grade 4 (21E, full thickness cartilage lesion exposing the subchondral bone)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126138&req=5

Figure 21: MRI images depicting grading of articular cartilage lesions based upon Modified Outerbridge classification. Grade 0 (21A, normal articular cartilage), grade 1 (21B, chondral surface fibrilation), grade 2 (21C, partial thickness chondral lesion), grade 3 (21D, full thickness cartilage lesion reaching the bone), grade 4 (21E, full thickness cartilage lesion exposing the subchondral bone)
Mentions: There are various modifications in MRI protocols and parameters which have been formulated to alter the SNR amongst structures surrounding articular cartilage in relation to cartilage proper, indirectly allowing us to ascertain subtle cartilage-based lesions [Figure 21]. MRA of knee helps to increase sensitivity for cartilage lesions and for detection of intra-articular bodies and their donor sites, but it is also not routinely performed. Indications for MRA include evaluation of articular cartilage.

Bottom Line: It is frequently exposed to trauma, degeneration, and repetitive wear and tear.MRI has played a vital role in evaluation of articular cartilage.With the availability of advanced repair surgeries for cartilage lesions, there has been an increased demand for improved cartilage imaging techniques.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Imaging Sciences, Global Hospitals, Mumbai, India.

ABSTRACT
We tried to review the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in understanding microscopic and morphologic structure of the articular cartilage. The optimal protocols and available spin-echo sequences in present day practice are reviewed in context of common pathologies of articular cartilage. The future trends of articular cartilage imaging have been discussed with their appropriateness. In diarthrodial joints of the body, articular cartilage is functionally very important. It is frequently exposed to trauma, degeneration, and repetitive wear and tear. MRI has played a vital role in evaluation of articular cartilage. With the availability of advanced repair surgeries for cartilage lesions, there has been an increased demand for improved cartilage imaging techniques. Recent advances in imaging strategies for native and postoperative articular cartilage open up an entirely new approach in management of cartilage-related pathologies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus