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Imaging of articular cartilage.

Paunipagar BK, Rasalkar D - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: It is frequently exposed to trauma, degeneration, and repetitive wear and tear.MRI has played a vital role in evaluation of articular cartilage.With the availability of advanced repair surgeries for cartilage lesions, there has been an increased demand for improved cartilage imaging techniques.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Imaging Sciences, Global Hospitals, Mumbai, India.

ABSTRACT
We tried to review the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in understanding microscopic and morphologic structure of the articular cartilage. The optimal protocols and available spin-echo sequences in present day practice are reviewed in context of common pathologies of articular cartilage. The future trends of articular cartilage imaging have been discussed with their appropriateness. In diarthrodial joints of the body, articular cartilage is functionally very important. It is frequently exposed to trauma, degeneration, and repetitive wear and tear. MRI has played a vital role in evaluation of articular cartilage. With the availability of advanced repair surgeries for cartilage lesions, there has been an increased demand for improved cartilage imaging techniques. Recent advances in imaging strategies for native and postoperative articular cartilage open up an entirely new approach in management of cartilage-related pathologies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 3D GRE, sagittal plane image of knee joint revealing articular cartilage. Note excellent details of articular cartilage. (short arrow) The additional advantage of this sequence is in imaging of joints with prior interventions or any grafts or screws fixations. (long arrow) Note the tiny blooming intensities (black arrow) around the BPB graft, likely postoperative bone fragments
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Figure 7: A 3D GRE, sagittal plane image of knee joint revealing articular cartilage. Note excellent details of articular cartilage. (short arrow) The additional advantage of this sequence is in imaging of joints with prior interventions or any grafts or screws fixations. (long arrow) Note the tiny blooming intensities (black arrow) around the BPB graft, likely postoperative bone fragments

Mentions: Gradient echo sequences allow volumetric image acquisition with reduced imaging times and improved spatial resolution. Technically, a refocusing pulse separates two or more gradient echoes, eventually combining the echoes to generate an image.[1516] Gradient-recalled echo (GRE) sequences suffer from a potential fallacy, as they are unusually sensitive and susceptible to intravoxel dephasing, especially in patients with previous surgical intervention or some hardware placement[13] [Figure 7].


Imaging of articular cartilage.

Paunipagar BK, Rasalkar D - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

A 3D GRE, sagittal plane image of knee joint revealing articular cartilage. Note excellent details of articular cartilage. (short arrow) The additional advantage of this sequence is in imaging of joints with prior interventions or any grafts or screws fixations. (long arrow) Note the tiny blooming intensities (black arrow) around the BPB graft, likely postoperative bone fragments
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126138&req=5

Figure 7: A 3D GRE, sagittal plane image of knee joint revealing articular cartilage. Note excellent details of articular cartilage. (short arrow) The additional advantage of this sequence is in imaging of joints with prior interventions or any grafts or screws fixations. (long arrow) Note the tiny blooming intensities (black arrow) around the BPB graft, likely postoperative bone fragments
Mentions: Gradient echo sequences allow volumetric image acquisition with reduced imaging times and improved spatial resolution. Technically, a refocusing pulse separates two or more gradient echoes, eventually combining the echoes to generate an image.[1516] Gradient-recalled echo (GRE) sequences suffer from a potential fallacy, as they are unusually sensitive and susceptible to intravoxel dephasing, especially in patients with previous surgical intervention or some hardware placement[13] [Figure 7].

Bottom Line: It is frequently exposed to trauma, degeneration, and repetitive wear and tear.MRI has played a vital role in evaluation of articular cartilage.With the availability of advanced repair surgeries for cartilage lesions, there has been an increased demand for improved cartilage imaging techniques.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Imaging Sciences, Global Hospitals, Mumbai, India.

ABSTRACT
We tried to review the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in understanding microscopic and morphologic structure of the articular cartilage. The optimal protocols and available spin-echo sequences in present day practice are reviewed in context of common pathologies of articular cartilage. The future trends of articular cartilage imaging have been discussed with their appropriateness. In diarthrodial joints of the body, articular cartilage is functionally very important. It is frequently exposed to trauma, degeneration, and repetitive wear and tear. MRI has played a vital role in evaluation of articular cartilage. With the availability of advanced repair surgeries for cartilage lesions, there has been an increased demand for improved cartilage imaging techniques. Recent advances in imaging strategies for native and postoperative articular cartilage open up an entirely new approach in management of cartilage-related pathologies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus