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Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Wrap-around/aliasing in MRI. A 47 year old male with lower buttock pain. Axial STIR MRI image shows a wrap-around/aliasing artifact from right hand (arrowhead) and mimicking a focal lesion of right femoral head (arrow)
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Figure 26: Wrap-around/aliasing in MRI. A 47 year old male with lower buttock pain. Axial STIR MRI image shows a wrap-around/aliasing artifact from right hand (arrowhead) and mimicking a focal lesion of right femoral head (arrow)

Mentions: The field of view (FOV) in MRI refers to the anatomic region being imaged. Deciding on an appropriate FOV depends on the size of the structure being imaged and taking into account the trade-offs between spatial resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio. If a FOV is chosen which is smaller than the anatomy being imaged, wrap-around or aliasing artifacts can occur.[49] This can lead to image data that are outside the FOV being “wrapped around” and artifactually included within the image [Figure 26]. This can be corrected by using a large enough FOV in the phase-encoding direction to include the entire body part or by using phase oversampling techniques during imaging.


Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Wrap-around/aliasing in MRI. A 47 year old male with lower buttock pain. Axial STIR MRI image shows a wrap-around/aliasing artifact from right hand (arrowhead) and mimicking a focal lesion of right femoral head (arrow)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126137&req=5

Figure 26: Wrap-around/aliasing in MRI. A 47 year old male with lower buttock pain. Axial STIR MRI image shows a wrap-around/aliasing artifact from right hand (arrowhead) and mimicking a focal lesion of right femoral head (arrow)
Mentions: The field of view (FOV) in MRI refers to the anatomic region being imaged. Deciding on an appropriate FOV depends on the size of the structure being imaged and taking into account the trade-offs between spatial resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio. If a FOV is chosen which is smaller than the anatomy being imaged, wrap-around or aliasing artifacts can occur.[49] This can lead to image data that are outside the FOV being “wrapped around” and artifactually included within the image [Figure 26]. This can be corrected by using a large enough FOV in the phase-encoding direction to include the entire body part or by using phase oversampling techniques during imaging.

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus