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Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Tuberculous osteomyelitis. A 32 year old male with buttock pain. (A) Coronal T1W and (B) coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI images show marrow signal abnormality in the sacrum (arrows) (C) Coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI image shows hyperintense abscess (arrowheads) abutting the inferior border of sacral lesion (arrows). (Images courtesy of Dr. Aditya Daftary, MD)
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Figure 23: Tuberculous osteomyelitis. A 32 year old male with buttock pain. (A) Coronal T1W and (B) coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI images show marrow signal abnormality in the sacrum (arrows) (C) Coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI image shows hyperintense abscess (arrowheads) abutting the inferior border of sacral lesion (arrows). (Images courtesy of Dr. Aditya Daftary, MD)

Mentions: Tuberculosis infection of bone deserves special mention and has been called “the great mimicker.”[46] Most prevalent in underdeveloped countries, tuberculous osteomyelitis differs from pyogenic osteomyelitis as fever and pain can be absent and the symptoms are more insidious in onset.[47] Nearly any bone can be affected [Figure 23] and it is primarily caused by hematogenous spread from other sites, most commonly lung.[47] Bony destruction, loss of normal T1 marrow signal, marrow enhancement, and adjacent abscess or septic arthritis can occur. Spinal involvement by tuberculosis is not uncommon and can differ from bacterial spinal infection in that the disc spaces are preserved until late in the disease due to the lack of proteolytic destructive enzymes by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.[4748] Finally, due to the hematogenous nature of spread, multifocal lesions can occur in the spine and appendicular skeleton, mimicking malignancy.[4748]


Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Tuberculous osteomyelitis. A 32 year old male with buttock pain. (A) Coronal T1W and (B) coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI images show marrow signal abnormality in the sacrum (arrows) (C) Coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI image shows hyperintense abscess (arrowheads) abutting the inferior border of sacral lesion (arrows). (Images courtesy of Dr. Aditya Daftary, MD)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 23: Tuberculous osteomyelitis. A 32 year old male with buttock pain. (A) Coronal T1W and (B) coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI images show marrow signal abnormality in the sacrum (arrows) (C) Coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI image shows hyperintense abscess (arrowheads) abutting the inferior border of sacral lesion (arrows). (Images courtesy of Dr. Aditya Daftary, MD)
Mentions: Tuberculosis infection of bone deserves special mention and has been called “the great mimicker.”[46] Most prevalent in underdeveloped countries, tuberculous osteomyelitis differs from pyogenic osteomyelitis as fever and pain can be absent and the symptoms are more insidious in onset.[47] Nearly any bone can be affected [Figure 23] and it is primarily caused by hematogenous spread from other sites, most commonly lung.[47] Bony destruction, loss of normal T1 marrow signal, marrow enhancement, and adjacent abscess or septic arthritis can occur. Spinal involvement by tuberculosis is not uncommon and can differ from bacterial spinal infection in that the disc spaces are preserved until late in the disease due to the lack of proteolytic destructive enzymes by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.[4748] Finally, due to the hematogenous nature of spread, multifocal lesions can occur in the spine and appendicular skeleton, mimicking malignancy.[4748]

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus