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Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Subchondral cyst. A 61 year old male with left knee pain. (A) AP radiograph of knee shows large subarticular lucencies with sclerotic rims (arrows) in the medial and lateral femoral condyles. There is narrowing of the joint space and osteophytosis (arrowheads) consistent with degenerative osteoarthritis (B) Coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI image demonstrates cystic lesions (arrows) abutting the narrowed joint space (arrowheads)
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Figure 21: Subchondral cyst. A 61 year old male with left knee pain. (A) AP radiograph of knee shows large subarticular lucencies with sclerotic rims (arrows) in the medial and lateral femoral condyles. There is narrowing of the joint space and osteophytosis (arrowheads) consistent with degenerative osteoarthritis (B) Coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI image demonstrates cystic lesions (arrows) abutting the narrowed joint space (arrowheads)

Mentions: In osteoarthritis, defects in the overlying cartilage can allow synovium and joint fluid to enter the subchondral bone causing subchondral cysts (geodes). They are typically small, about the articular surface, and have a sclerotic margin [Figure 21]. However, they can be large, but may extend down the shaft of a tubular bone mimicking a neoplasm.[22] CT can be helpful in demonstrating the sclerotic margin. On MRI, the lesion behaves like a cyst and is typically isointense to muscle on T1W images and hyperintense on T2W images. High T1 signal may occur in lesions that contain proteinaceous material, and internal enhancement may be seen if the lesions contain fibrous material. There should be evidence of osteoarthritis in the joint to support this diagnosis and changes are most often seen on both sides of the joint.[22]


Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Subchondral cyst. A 61 year old male with left knee pain. (A) AP radiograph of knee shows large subarticular lucencies with sclerotic rims (arrows) in the medial and lateral femoral condyles. There is narrowing of the joint space and osteophytosis (arrowheads) consistent with degenerative osteoarthritis (B) Coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI image demonstrates cystic lesions (arrows) abutting the narrowed joint space (arrowheads)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126137&req=5

Figure 21: Subchondral cyst. A 61 year old male with left knee pain. (A) AP radiograph of knee shows large subarticular lucencies with sclerotic rims (arrows) in the medial and lateral femoral condyles. There is narrowing of the joint space and osteophytosis (arrowheads) consistent with degenerative osteoarthritis (B) Coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI image demonstrates cystic lesions (arrows) abutting the narrowed joint space (arrowheads)
Mentions: In osteoarthritis, defects in the overlying cartilage can allow synovium and joint fluid to enter the subchondral bone causing subchondral cysts (geodes). They are typically small, about the articular surface, and have a sclerotic margin [Figure 21]. However, they can be large, but may extend down the shaft of a tubular bone mimicking a neoplasm.[22] CT can be helpful in demonstrating the sclerotic margin. On MRI, the lesion behaves like a cyst and is typically isointense to muscle on T1W images and hyperintense on T2W images. High T1 signal may occur in lesions that contain proteinaceous material, and internal enhancement may be seen if the lesions contain fibrous material. There should be evidence of osteoarthritis in the joint to support this diagnosis and changes are most often seen on both sides of the joint.[22]

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus