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Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Melorheostosis. A 43 year old male with knee pain. (A) Lateral lower leg radiograph and (B) sagittal CT image of the tibia demonstrate dense cortical thickening (arrows) along the posterior fibula that simulates dripping candle wax
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Figure 19: Melorheostosis. A 43 year old male with knee pain. (A) Lateral lower leg radiograph and (B) sagittal CT image of the tibia demonstrate dense cortical thickening (arrows) along the posterior fibula that simulates dripping candle wax

Mentions: Melorheostosis is a benign bone dysplasia characterized by sclerotic bone lesions, often described as “dripping candle wax.”[34] Melorheostosis is not a hereditary disorder and is often asymptomatic; however, when symptoms do occur, they include pain, limb deformities and contractures related to muscle and tendon shortening, skin disorders, and poor circulation.[35] There is an association with soft tissue hemangiomas and neurofibromas.[36] The lesions can be mistaken for a surface osteosarcoma or osteochondroma. On imaging, there is characteristic flowing cortical hyperostosis [Figure 19] and can involve multiple contiguous bones in a sclerotomal distribution.[37] Low signal intensity is seen on all MRI sequences, but there may be surrounding soft tissue edema. The lesions may also be active on technetium-99 m pyrophosphate bone scintigraphy.[38]


Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Melorheostosis. A 43 year old male with knee pain. (A) Lateral lower leg radiograph and (B) sagittal CT image of the tibia demonstrate dense cortical thickening (arrows) along the posterior fibula that simulates dripping candle wax
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126137&req=5

Figure 19: Melorheostosis. A 43 year old male with knee pain. (A) Lateral lower leg radiograph and (B) sagittal CT image of the tibia demonstrate dense cortical thickening (arrows) along the posterior fibula that simulates dripping candle wax
Mentions: Melorheostosis is a benign bone dysplasia characterized by sclerotic bone lesions, often described as “dripping candle wax.”[34] Melorheostosis is not a hereditary disorder and is often asymptomatic; however, when symptoms do occur, they include pain, limb deformities and contractures related to muscle and tendon shortening, skin disorders, and poor circulation.[35] There is an association with soft tissue hemangiomas and neurofibromas.[36] The lesions can be mistaken for a surface osteosarcoma or osteochondroma. On imaging, there is characteristic flowing cortical hyperostosis [Figure 19] and can involve multiple contiguous bones in a sclerotomal distribution.[37] Low signal intensity is seen on all MRI sequences, but there may be surrounding soft tissue edema. The lesions may also be active on technetium-99 m pyrophosphate bone scintigraphy.[38]

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus