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Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Myositis ossificans. A 53 year old female with a palpable mass along the right distal tibia. (A) Lateral radiograph shows an oval nodule (arrow) with dense periphery at the anterior aspect of tibial shaft (B) Sagittal and (C) axial CT images demonstrate a peripheral rim of calcification and central ossification in the lesion (arrows) and a small cleft (black arrowheads) between the mass and the tibial cortex
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Figure 13: Myositis ossificans. A 53 year old female with a palpable mass along the right distal tibia. (A) Lateral radiograph shows an oval nodule (arrow) with dense periphery at the anterior aspect of tibial shaft (B) Sagittal and (C) axial CT images demonstrate a peripheral rim of calcification and central ossification in the lesion (arrows) and a small cleft (black arrowheads) between the mass and the tibial cortex

Mentions: Myositis ossificans is heterotopic ossification that occurs in muscle usually following trauma, although the patient may be unable to recall the precipitating trauma.[23] This commonly occurs in the upper and lower extremities, usually in the lateral muscles. Patients may be asymptomatic or present with pain, swelling, or an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Ossification develops 3-8 weeks after onset, beginning peripherally and progressing centrally. Initially, myositis ossificans forms faint irregular densities; but with time, a rim of mature lamellar bone and central osteoid matrix can develop [Figure 13]. The MRI appearance is variable depending on the stage of development, and earlier on, can mimic a sarcoma as there may be enhancement following contrast administration.[24] Differentiation from an osteochondroma or osteosarcoma may also be difficult if the area of ossification is adherent to the adjacent bone. CT can be helpful in demonstrating a plane of soft tissue between the mass and the bony cortex. Myositis ossificans may be difficult to distinguish from an osteosarcoma even on biopsy specimens.[25]


Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Myositis ossificans. A 53 year old female with a palpable mass along the right distal tibia. (A) Lateral radiograph shows an oval nodule (arrow) with dense periphery at the anterior aspect of tibial shaft (B) Sagittal and (C) axial CT images demonstrate a peripheral rim of calcification and central ossification in the lesion (arrows) and a small cleft (black arrowheads) between the mass and the tibial cortex
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126137&req=5

Figure 13: Myositis ossificans. A 53 year old female with a palpable mass along the right distal tibia. (A) Lateral radiograph shows an oval nodule (arrow) with dense periphery at the anterior aspect of tibial shaft (B) Sagittal and (C) axial CT images demonstrate a peripheral rim of calcification and central ossification in the lesion (arrows) and a small cleft (black arrowheads) between the mass and the tibial cortex
Mentions: Myositis ossificans is heterotopic ossification that occurs in muscle usually following trauma, although the patient may be unable to recall the precipitating trauma.[23] This commonly occurs in the upper and lower extremities, usually in the lateral muscles. Patients may be asymptomatic or present with pain, swelling, or an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Ossification develops 3-8 weeks after onset, beginning peripherally and progressing centrally. Initially, myositis ossificans forms faint irregular densities; but with time, a rim of mature lamellar bone and central osteoid matrix can develop [Figure 13]. The MRI appearance is variable depending on the stage of development, and earlier on, can mimic a sarcoma as there may be enhancement following contrast administration.[24] Differentiation from an osteochondroma or osteosarcoma may also be difficult if the area of ossification is adherent to the adjacent bone. CT can be helpful in demonstrating a plane of soft tissue between the mass and the bony cortex. Myositis ossificans may be difficult to distinguish from an osteosarcoma even on biopsy specimens.[25]

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus