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Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Subperiosteal hematoma. A 53 year old male with history of remote thigh trauma. (A) AP radiograph and (B) coronal CT image of left hip show a lesion (arrows) arising from the medial femoral cortex with central ossification (C) Axial T1W MRI image demonstrates a chronic subperiosteal hematoma that contains central fatty marrow (arrowhead) and cortical bone (arrow)
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Figure 10: Subperiosteal hematoma. A 53 year old male with history of remote thigh trauma. (A) AP radiograph and (B) coronal CT image of left hip show a lesion (arrows) arising from the medial femoral cortex with central ossification (C) Axial T1W MRI image demonstrates a chronic subperiosteal hematoma that contains central fatty marrow (arrowhead) and cortical bone (arrow)

Mentions: The periosteum is a highly vascular thick fibrous membrane that is closely adherent to the bone.[19] Injury to the periosteum can result in a subperiosteal hematoma, which lifts the periosteum off the bone and can resemble a focal mass such as a parosteal osteosarcoma or osteochondroma [Figure 10]. Most often, they resolve without treatment; however, they may ossify and persist.[19] On imaging, these lesions have a non-aggressive appearance and are centered in the subperiosteum. If they ossify, they can contain fatty marrow.[20]


Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Subperiosteal hematoma. A 53 year old male with history of remote thigh trauma. (A) AP radiograph and (B) coronal CT image of left hip show a lesion (arrows) arising from the medial femoral cortex with central ossification (C) Axial T1W MRI image demonstrates a chronic subperiosteal hematoma that contains central fatty marrow (arrowhead) and cortical bone (arrow)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126137&req=5

Figure 10: Subperiosteal hematoma. A 53 year old male with history of remote thigh trauma. (A) AP radiograph and (B) coronal CT image of left hip show a lesion (arrows) arising from the medial femoral cortex with central ossification (C) Axial T1W MRI image demonstrates a chronic subperiosteal hematoma that contains central fatty marrow (arrowhead) and cortical bone (arrow)
Mentions: The periosteum is a highly vascular thick fibrous membrane that is closely adherent to the bone.[19] Injury to the periosteum can result in a subperiosteal hematoma, which lifts the periosteum off the bone and can resemble a focal mass such as a parosteal osteosarcoma or osteochondroma [Figure 10]. Most often, they resolve without treatment; however, they may ossify and persist.[19] On imaging, these lesions have a non-aggressive appearance and are centered in the subperiosteum. If they ossify, they can contain fatty marrow.[20]

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus