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Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Soleal line. A 67 year old male with suspected right leg fracture after fall. (A) AP and (B) lateral radiographs of the proximal tibia demonstrate linear cortical thickening (arrows) along the proximal tibia and fibula, which corresponds to an enthesophyte from the attachment of the soleus. The tibial calcification extends lateral to medial along the posterior cortex
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Figure 9: Soleal line. A 67 year old male with suspected right leg fracture after fall. (A) AP and (B) lateral radiographs of the proximal tibia demonstrate linear cortical thickening (arrows) along the proximal tibia and fibula, which corresponds to an enthesophyte from the attachment of the soleus. The tibial calcification extends lateral to medial along the posterior cortex

Mentions: The soleal line is a bony “tug lesion” that can form on the tibia at the attachment of the soleus and mimics periostitis from a tumor, infection, or stress fracture [Figure 9].[17] The soleal line begins 1-2 cm below the fibular facet and may present as a line or a ridge.[18] This can arise from the tibial head of the soleus, with cortical thickening extending lateral to medial along the posterior upper one-third of the tibia. Similar bony changes can be seen at the fibular attachment of the soleus.


Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Soleal line. A 67 year old male with suspected right leg fracture after fall. (A) AP and (B) lateral radiographs of the proximal tibia demonstrate linear cortical thickening (arrows) along the proximal tibia and fibula, which corresponds to an enthesophyte from the attachment of the soleus. The tibial calcification extends lateral to medial along the posterior cortex
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126137&req=5

Figure 9: Soleal line. A 67 year old male with suspected right leg fracture after fall. (A) AP and (B) lateral radiographs of the proximal tibia demonstrate linear cortical thickening (arrows) along the proximal tibia and fibula, which corresponds to an enthesophyte from the attachment of the soleus. The tibial calcification extends lateral to medial along the posterior cortex
Mentions: The soleal line is a bony “tug lesion” that can form on the tibia at the attachment of the soleus and mimics periostitis from a tumor, infection, or stress fracture [Figure 9].[17] The soleal line begins 1-2 cm below the fibular facet and may present as a line or a ridge.[18] This can arise from the tibial head of the soleus, with cortical thickening extending lateral to medial along the posterior upper one-third of the tibia. Similar bony changes can be seen at the fibular attachment of the soleus.

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus