Limits...
Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Supracondylar process of the humerus. A 45 year old male with right elbow pain. (A) AP radiograph of elbow shows an osseous process (arrow) arising from anteromedial aspect of the distal humerus. Corresponding ultrasound image (B) demonstrates an osseous excrescence (arrow) with a hyperintense ligament of Struthers (arrowhead) attached onto it
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126137&req=5

Figure 8: Supracondylar process of the humerus. A 45 year old male with right elbow pain. (A) AP radiograph of elbow shows an osseous process (arrow) arising from anteromedial aspect of the distal humerus. Corresponding ultrasound image (B) demonstrates an osseous excrescence (arrow) with a hyperintense ligament of Struthers (arrowhead) attached onto it

Mentions: A supracondylar process in the humerus is a bony spur that arises from the anteromedial aspect of the humerus in about 1-3% of the population.[15] It is usually an incidental finding and should not be mistaken for an osteochondroma or surface osteosarcoma. Osteochondromas point away from the joint, whereas the supracondylar process points toward the elbow joint [Figure 8]. Occasionally, a ligament extends from the supracondylar process to the medial epicondyle (the ligament of Struthers), forming a tunnel that can entrap the median nerve and even the brachial artery, leading to symptoms.[16]


Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Supracondylar process of the humerus. A 45 year old male with right elbow pain. (A) AP radiograph of elbow shows an osseous process (arrow) arising from anteromedial aspect of the distal humerus. Corresponding ultrasound image (B) demonstrates an osseous excrescence (arrow) with a hyperintense ligament of Struthers (arrowhead) attached onto it
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126137&req=5

Figure 8: Supracondylar process of the humerus. A 45 year old male with right elbow pain. (A) AP radiograph of elbow shows an osseous process (arrow) arising from anteromedial aspect of the distal humerus. Corresponding ultrasound image (B) demonstrates an osseous excrescence (arrow) with a hyperintense ligament of Struthers (arrowhead) attached onto it
Mentions: A supracondylar process in the humerus is a bony spur that arises from the anteromedial aspect of the humerus in about 1-3% of the population.[15] It is usually an incidental finding and should not be mistaken for an osteochondroma or surface osteosarcoma. Osteochondromas point away from the joint, whereas the supracondylar process points toward the elbow joint [Figure 8]. Occasionally, a ligament extends from the supracondylar process to the medial epicondyle (the ligament of Struthers), forming a tunnel that can entrap the median nerve and even the brachial artery, leading to symptoms.[16]

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus