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Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Synovial herniation pit in the proximal femur. A 60 year old female with suspected hip fracture after a fall. (A) AP radiograph shows a small round radiolucency (arrow) and sclerotic rim at the superior lateral aspect of the femoral neck. The lesion (arrow) is hypointense on the (B) coronal T1W MRI image and hyperintense on the (C) coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI image
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Figure 6: Synovial herniation pit in the proximal femur. A 60 year old female with suspected hip fracture after a fall. (A) AP radiograph shows a small round radiolucency (arrow) and sclerotic rim at the superior lateral aspect of the femoral neck. The lesion (arrow) is hypointense on the (B) coronal T1W MRI image and hyperintense on the (C) coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI image

Mentions: A well-defined round or oval radiolucency in the proximal superior femoral neck is known as a synovial herniation pit or Pitt's pit.[10] It is thought to represent herniation of the synovium into cortical defects created by abrasion of the hip joint capsule against the femoral neck, although it may represent a normal variant [Figure 6].[11] Typically these lesions are less than 1 cm in size, but can grow up to 2-3 cm and may be lobulated.[12] Although these lesions have been considered asymptomatic, an association with femoracetabular impingement has been described.[11]


Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay.

Mhuircheartaigh JN, Lin YC, Wu JS - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Synovial herniation pit in the proximal femur. A 60 year old female with suspected hip fracture after a fall. (A) AP radiograph shows a small round radiolucency (arrow) and sclerotic rim at the superior lateral aspect of the femoral neck. The lesion (arrow) is hypointense on the (B) coronal T1W MRI image and hyperintense on the (C) coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI image
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126137&req=5

Figure 6: Synovial herniation pit in the proximal femur. A 60 year old female with suspected hip fracture after a fall. (A) AP radiograph shows a small round radiolucency (arrow) and sclerotic rim at the superior lateral aspect of the femoral neck. The lesion (arrow) is hypointense on the (B) coronal T1W MRI image and hyperintense on the (C) coronal T2W fat-saturated MRI image
Mentions: A well-defined round or oval radiolucency in the proximal superior femoral neck is known as a synovial herniation pit or Pitt's pit.[10] It is thought to represent herniation of the synovium into cortical defects created by abrasion of the hip joint capsule against the femoral neck, although it may represent a normal variant [Figure 6].[11] Typically these lesions are less than 1 cm in size, but can grow up to 2-3 cm and may be lobulated.[12] Although these lesions have been considered asymptomatic, an association with femoracetabular impingement has been described.[11]

Bottom Line: These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes.It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup.Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

ABSTRACT
Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus