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Role of MR spectroscopy in musculoskeletal imaging.

Deshmukh S, Subhawong T, Carrino JA, Fayad L - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: By detecting signals of water, lipids, and other metabolites, MRS can provide metabolic information for lesion characterization and assessment of treatment response.Although MRS has been routinely used in the brain, clinical applications within the musculoskeletal system have only more recently emerged.The aim of this article is to review the technical considerations for performing MRS in the musculoskeletal system, focusing on proton MRS, and to discuss its potential roles in musculoskeletal tumor imaging and the assessment of muscle physiology and disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1800 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD, Maryland, USA.

ABSTRACT
Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is an imaging approach that allows for the noninvasive molecular characterization of a region of interest. By detecting signals of water, lipids, and other metabolites, MRS can provide metabolic information for lesion characterization and assessment of treatment response. Although MRS has been routinely used in the brain, clinical applications within the musculoskeletal system have only more recently emerged. The aim of this article is to review the technical considerations for performing MRS in the musculoskeletal system, focusing on proton MRS, and to discuss its potential roles in musculoskeletal tumor imaging and the assessment of muscle physiology and disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Graph demonstrates different molecular resonance frequencies for a variety of metabolites. The typical proton spectrum of normal muscle demonstrates frequencies corresponding to water, choline, creatine, and lipids. Total choline, a marker for malignancy, demonstrates a peak at 3.2 ppm. In addition, intramyocellular (IMCL) and extramyocellular (EMCL) lipid compartments are shown. Intramuscular metabolism, in particular, has broad potential clinical and research applications. (Reprinted with permission from AJR)[5]
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Figure 1: Graph demonstrates different molecular resonance frequencies for a variety of metabolites. The typical proton spectrum of normal muscle demonstrates frequencies corresponding to water, choline, creatine, and lipids. Total choline, a marker for malignancy, demonstrates a peak at 3.2 ppm. In addition, intramyocellular (IMCL) and extramyocellular (EMCL) lipid compartments are shown. Intramuscular metabolism, in particular, has broad potential clinical and research applications. (Reprinted with permission from AJR)[5]

Mentions: Different metabolites can be observed depending on the MRS technique [Figure 1]. For example, with phosophorus-31 (31P) MRS, signals from tissue metabolites containing phosphorus are examined, including phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and ATP, which are all metabolites of interest in muscle physiology and disease.[13] In the research setting, MRS with 31P has also demonstrated potential for the evaluation of musculoskeletal masses and response to treatment.[45] However, phosophorus-31 MRS (similar to other heteronuclear MRS) requires specialized MRI hardware, which, along with its spatial resolution, limits its clinical utility.[5] Proton (1H) MRS is more easily integrated into clinical practice as it requires no specialized equipment and can be performed as part of a routine MRI examination; proton MRS is currently regularly utilized in the clinical setting for assessment of the brain.[1] More recently, improved spectral acquisition and analysis techniques, including both single-voxel and MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), along with enhanced gradient performance have led to the application of proton MRS for the evaluation of musculoskeletal pathology.[5]


Role of MR spectroscopy in musculoskeletal imaging.

Deshmukh S, Subhawong T, Carrino JA, Fayad L - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2014)

Graph demonstrates different molecular resonance frequencies for a variety of metabolites. The typical proton spectrum of normal muscle demonstrates frequencies corresponding to water, choline, creatine, and lipids. Total choline, a marker for malignancy, demonstrates a peak at 3.2 ppm. In addition, intramyocellular (IMCL) and extramyocellular (EMCL) lipid compartments are shown. Intramuscular metabolism, in particular, has broad potential clinical and research applications. (Reprinted with permission from AJR)[5]
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126135&req=5

Figure 1: Graph demonstrates different molecular resonance frequencies for a variety of metabolites. The typical proton spectrum of normal muscle demonstrates frequencies corresponding to water, choline, creatine, and lipids. Total choline, a marker for malignancy, demonstrates a peak at 3.2 ppm. In addition, intramyocellular (IMCL) and extramyocellular (EMCL) lipid compartments are shown. Intramuscular metabolism, in particular, has broad potential clinical and research applications. (Reprinted with permission from AJR)[5]
Mentions: Different metabolites can be observed depending on the MRS technique [Figure 1]. For example, with phosophorus-31 (31P) MRS, signals from tissue metabolites containing phosphorus are examined, including phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and ATP, which are all metabolites of interest in muscle physiology and disease.[13] In the research setting, MRS with 31P has also demonstrated potential for the evaluation of musculoskeletal masses and response to treatment.[45] However, phosophorus-31 MRS (similar to other heteronuclear MRS) requires specialized MRI hardware, which, along with its spatial resolution, limits its clinical utility.[5] Proton (1H) MRS is more easily integrated into clinical practice as it requires no specialized equipment and can be performed as part of a routine MRI examination; proton MRS is currently regularly utilized in the clinical setting for assessment of the brain.[1] More recently, improved spectral acquisition and analysis techniques, including both single-voxel and MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), along with enhanced gradient performance have led to the application of proton MRS for the evaluation of musculoskeletal pathology.[5]

Bottom Line: By detecting signals of water, lipids, and other metabolites, MRS can provide metabolic information for lesion characterization and assessment of treatment response.Although MRS has been routinely used in the brain, clinical applications within the musculoskeletal system have only more recently emerged.The aim of this article is to review the technical considerations for performing MRS in the musculoskeletal system, focusing on proton MRS, and to discuss its potential roles in musculoskeletal tumor imaging and the assessment of muscle physiology and disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1800 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD, Maryland, USA.

ABSTRACT
Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is an imaging approach that allows for the noninvasive molecular characterization of a region of interest. By detecting signals of water, lipids, and other metabolites, MRS can provide metabolic information for lesion characterization and assessment of treatment response. Although MRS has been routinely used in the brain, clinical applications within the musculoskeletal system have only more recently emerged. The aim of this article is to review the technical considerations for performing MRS in the musculoskeletal system, focusing on proton MRS, and to discuss its potential roles in musculoskeletal tumor imaging and the assessment of muscle physiology and disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus