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Ultrasound: A novel tool for airway imaging.

Parmar SB, Mehta HK, Shah NK, Parikh SN, Solanki KG - J Emerg Trauma Shock (2014)

Bottom Line: We included 100 adult, healthy volunteers of either sex to undergo airway imaging systemically starting from floor of the mouth to the sternal notch in anterior aspect of neck by sonography.Interface between air and mucosa lining the airway produced a bright hyperechoic linear appearance.Artifacts created by intraluminal air prevented visualization of posterior pharynx, posterior commissure, and posterior wall of trachea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesiology, Byramjee Jeejeebhoy Medical College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

ABSTRACT

Context: The scope of ultrasound is emerging in medical science, particularly outside traditional areas of radiology practice.

Aims: We designed this study to evaluate feasibility of bedside sonography as a tool for airway assessment and to describe sonographic anatomy of airway.

Settings and design: A prospective, clinical study.

Materials and methods: We included 100 adult, healthy volunteers of either sex to undergo airway imaging systemically starting from floor of the mouth to the sternal notch in anterior aspect of neck by sonography.

Results: We could visualize mandible and hyoid bone as a bright hyperechoic structure with hypoechoic acoustic shadow underneath. Epiglottis, thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage, and tracheal rings appeared hypoechoic. Vocal cords were visualized through thyroid cartilage. Interface between air and mucosa lining the airway produced a bright hyperechoic linear appearance. Artifacts created by intraluminal air prevented visualization of posterior pharynx, posterior commissure, and posterior wall of trachea.

Conclusions: Ultrasound is safe, quick, noninvasive, repeatable, and bedside tool to assess the airway and can provide real-time dynamic images relevant for several aspects of airway management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Submandibular transverse view using a curvilinear transducer. The scan shows genioglossus (GG), geniohyoid (GH), hyoglossus (HG), lingual septum (LS), mandible (M), tongue surface (TS), and palate (PAL)
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Figure 1: Submandibular transverse view using a curvilinear transducer. The scan shows genioglossus (GG), geniohyoid (GH), hyoglossus (HG), lingual septum (LS), mandible (M), tongue surface (TS), and palate (PAL)

Mentions: The tongue appeared like a curvilinear hyperechoic structure on transverse view in the submandibular region using a curvilinear transducer [Figure 1]. The mylohyoid, geniohyoid, and genioglossus muscles appeared like hypoechoic structures. The lingual septum appeared like a linear hyperechoic structure in the vertical midline. The palate could be visualized by keeping the tongue in close contact with palate.[56789]


Ultrasound: A novel tool for airway imaging.

Parmar SB, Mehta HK, Shah NK, Parikh SN, Solanki KG - J Emerg Trauma Shock (2014)

Submandibular transverse view using a curvilinear transducer. The scan shows genioglossus (GG), geniohyoid (GH), hyoglossus (HG), lingual septum (LS), mandible (M), tongue surface (TS), and palate (PAL)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126113&req=5

Figure 1: Submandibular transverse view using a curvilinear transducer. The scan shows genioglossus (GG), geniohyoid (GH), hyoglossus (HG), lingual septum (LS), mandible (M), tongue surface (TS), and palate (PAL)
Mentions: The tongue appeared like a curvilinear hyperechoic structure on transverse view in the submandibular region using a curvilinear transducer [Figure 1]. The mylohyoid, geniohyoid, and genioglossus muscles appeared like hypoechoic structures. The lingual septum appeared like a linear hyperechoic structure in the vertical midline. The palate could be visualized by keeping the tongue in close contact with palate.[56789]

Bottom Line: We included 100 adult, healthy volunteers of either sex to undergo airway imaging systemically starting from floor of the mouth to the sternal notch in anterior aspect of neck by sonography.Interface between air and mucosa lining the airway produced a bright hyperechoic linear appearance.Artifacts created by intraluminal air prevented visualization of posterior pharynx, posterior commissure, and posterior wall of trachea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesiology, Byramjee Jeejeebhoy Medical College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

ABSTRACT

Context: The scope of ultrasound is emerging in medical science, particularly outside traditional areas of radiology practice.

Aims: We designed this study to evaluate feasibility of bedside sonography as a tool for airway assessment and to describe sonographic anatomy of airway.

Settings and design: A prospective, clinical study.

Materials and methods: We included 100 adult, healthy volunteers of either sex to undergo airway imaging systemically starting from floor of the mouth to the sternal notch in anterior aspect of neck by sonography.

Results: We could visualize mandible and hyoid bone as a bright hyperechoic structure with hypoechoic acoustic shadow underneath. Epiglottis, thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage, and tracheal rings appeared hypoechoic. Vocal cords were visualized through thyroid cartilage. Interface between air and mucosa lining the airway produced a bright hyperechoic linear appearance. Artifacts created by intraluminal air prevented visualization of posterior pharynx, posterior commissure, and posterior wall of trachea.

Conclusions: Ultrasound is safe, quick, noninvasive, repeatable, and bedside tool to assess the airway and can provide real-time dynamic images relevant for several aspects of airway management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus