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Anti-inflammatory effects of Lactococcus lactis NCDO 2118 during the remission period of chemically induced colitis.

Luerce TD, Gomes-Santos AC, Rocha CS, Moreira TG, Cruz DN, Lemos L, Sousa AL, Pereira VB, de Azevedo M, Moraes K, Cara DC, LeBlanc JG, Azevedo V, Faria AM, Miyoshi A - Gut Pathog (2014)

Bottom Line: Only one strain, L. lactis NCDO 2118, was able to reduce IL-1β-induced IL-8 secretion in Caco-2 cells, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory effect.This protective effect was not attributable to changes in secretory IgA (sIgA); however, NCDO 2118 administration was associated with an early increase in IL-6 production and sustained IL-10 production in colonic tissue.Here, we identified a new probiotic strain with a potential role in the treatment of IBD, and we elucidated some of the mechanisms underlying its anti-inflammatory effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biologia Geral, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627 - 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many probiotic bacteria have been described as promising tools for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Most of these bacteria are lactic acid bacteria, which are part of the healthy human microbiota. However, little is known about the effects of transient bacteria present in normal diets, including Lactococcus lactis.

Methods: In the present study, we analysed the immunomodulatory effects of three L. lactis strains in vitro using intestinal epithelial cells. L. lactis NCDO 2118 was administered for 4 days to C57BL/6 mice during the remission period of colitis induced by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS).

Results: Only one strain, L. lactis NCDO 2118, was able to reduce IL-1β-induced IL-8 secretion in Caco-2 cells, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory effect. Oral treatment using L. lactis NCDO 2118 resulted in a milder form of recurrent colitis than that observed in control diseased mice. This protective effect was not attributable to changes in secretory IgA (sIgA); however, NCDO 2118 administration was associated with an early increase in IL-6 production and sustained IL-10 production in colonic tissue. Mice fed L. lactis NCDO 2118 had an increased number of regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Tregs) bearing surface TGF-β in its latent form (Latency-associated peptide-LAP) in the mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen.

Conclusions: Here, we identified a new probiotic strain with a potential role in the treatment of IBD, and we elucidated some of the mechanisms underlying its anti-inflammatory effect.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of L. lactis NCDO 2118 on cytokine production by colonic cells. Colonic IL-6 (A), IL-12 (B), IFN-γ (C), IL-17 (D), TGF-β (E), IL-10 (F) and TNF-α (G) were measured by ELISA in mice from control, DSS and DSS + NCDO2118 groups. One representative result from two independent repetitions is shown. Bars represent the mean ± MSE of 5 mice per group. *, p < 0.05, **, p < 0.01, ***, p < 0.001.
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Figure 5: Effect of L. lactis NCDO 2118 on cytokine production by colonic cells. Colonic IL-6 (A), IL-12 (B), IFN-γ (C), IL-17 (D), TGF-β (E), IL-10 (F) and TNF-α (G) were measured by ELISA in mice from control, DSS and DSS + NCDO2118 groups. One representative result from two independent repetitions is shown. Bars represent the mean ± MSE of 5 mice per group. *, p < 0.05, **, p < 0.01, ***, p < 0.001.

Mentions: To further identify potential mechanisms by which L. lactis NCDO 2118 exerts its beneficial effects, cytokine profiles in colonic tissue were evaluated at days 14 and 21. Oral administration of NCDO2118 significantly increased the levels of IL-6 at day 14, while the levels of this cytokine were higher at day 21 in both DSS- and DSS + NCDO2118-treated groups (Figure 5A). The exposure of C57BL/6 to 2% DSS led to increased IL-12 levels only at day 21, and L. lactis did not affect this phenomenon (Figure 5B). Despite this, the levels of IFN-γ did not change due to DSS or L. lactis treatment (Figure 5C). IL-17 levels were reduced at day 21 in both the DSS and DSS + NCDO2118 groups (Figure 5D). TGF-β was not affected by DSS or L. lactis (Figure 5E). The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly decreased in the DSS-treated group but not in the NCDO 2118-treated group at day 21 (Figure 5F). Lastly, the TNF-α level was increased in DSS-treated mice at day 14, while the TNF-α level in the NCDO 2118-treated mice was maintained at a level similar to that of the control group.


Anti-inflammatory effects of Lactococcus lactis NCDO 2118 during the remission period of chemically induced colitis.

Luerce TD, Gomes-Santos AC, Rocha CS, Moreira TG, Cruz DN, Lemos L, Sousa AL, Pereira VB, de Azevedo M, Moraes K, Cara DC, LeBlanc JG, Azevedo V, Faria AM, Miyoshi A - Gut Pathog (2014)

Effect of L. lactis NCDO 2118 on cytokine production by colonic cells. Colonic IL-6 (A), IL-12 (B), IFN-γ (C), IL-17 (D), TGF-β (E), IL-10 (F) and TNF-α (G) were measured by ELISA in mice from control, DSS and DSS + NCDO2118 groups. One representative result from two independent repetitions is shown. Bars represent the mean ± MSE of 5 mice per group. *, p < 0.05, **, p < 0.01, ***, p < 0.001.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126083&req=5

Figure 5: Effect of L. lactis NCDO 2118 on cytokine production by colonic cells. Colonic IL-6 (A), IL-12 (B), IFN-γ (C), IL-17 (D), TGF-β (E), IL-10 (F) and TNF-α (G) were measured by ELISA in mice from control, DSS and DSS + NCDO2118 groups. One representative result from two independent repetitions is shown. Bars represent the mean ± MSE of 5 mice per group. *, p < 0.05, **, p < 0.01, ***, p < 0.001.
Mentions: To further identify potential mechanisms by which L. lactis NCDO 2118 exerts its beneficial effects, cytokine profiles in colonic tissue were evaluated at days 14 and 21. Oral administration of NCDO2118 significantly increased the levels of IL-6 at day 14, while the levels of this cytokine were higher at day 21 in both DSS- and DSS + NCDO2118-treated groups (Figure 5A). The exposure of C57BL/6 to 2% DSS led to increased IL-12 levels only at day 21, and L. lactis did not affect this phenomenon (Figure 5B). Despite this, the levels of IFN-γ did not change due to DSS or L. lactis treatment (Figure 5C). IL-17 levels were reduced at day 21 in both the DSS and DSS + NCDO2118 groups (Figure 5D). TGF-β was not affected by DSS or L. lactis (Figure 5E). The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly decreased in the DSS-treated group but not in the NCDO 2118-treated group at day 21 (Figure 5F). Lastly, the TNF-α level was increased in DSS-treated mice at day 14, while the TNF-α level in the NCDO 2118-treated mice was maintained at a level similar to that of the control group.

Bottom Line: Only one strain, L. lactis NCDO 2118, was able to reduce IL-1β-induced IL-8 secretion in Caco-2 cells, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory effect.This protective effect was not attributable to changes in secretory IgA (sIgA); however, NCDO 2118 administration was associated with an early increase in IL-6 production and sustained IL-10 production in colonic tissue.Here, we identified a new probiotic strain with a potential role in the treatment of IBD, and we elucidated some of the mechanisms underlying its anti-inflammatory effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biologia Geral, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627 - 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many probiotic bacteria have been described as promising tools for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Most of these bacteria are lactic acid bacteria, which are part of the healthy human microbiota. However, little is known about the effects of transient bacteria present in normal diets, including Lactococcus lactis.

Methods: In the present study, we analysed the immunomodulatory effects of three L. lactis strains in vitro using intestinal epithelial cells. L. lactis NCDO 2118 was administered for 4 days to C57BL/6 mice during the remission period of colitis induced by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS).

Results: Only one strain, L. lactis NCDO 2118, was able to reduce IL-1β-induced IL-8 secretion in Caco-2 cells, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory effect. Oral treatment using L. lactis NCDO 2118 resulted in a milder form of recurrent colitis than that observed in control diseased mice. This protective effect was not attributable to changes in secretory IgA (sIgA); however, NCDO 2118 administration was associated with an early increase in IL-6 production and sustained IL-10 production in colonic tissue. Mice fed L. lactis NCDO 2118 had an increased number of regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Tregs) bearing surface TGF-β in its latent form (Latency-associated peptide-LAP) in the mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen.

Conclusions: Here, we identified a new probiotic strain with a potential role in the treatment of IBD, and we elucidated some of the mechanisms underlying its anti-inflammatory effect.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus