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Dysphagia in Lewy body dementia - a clinical observational study of swallowing function by videofluoroscopic examination.

Londos E, Hanxsson O, Alm Hirsch I, Janneskog A, Bülow M, Palmqvist S - BMC Neurol (2013)

Bottom Line: Twenty-four (92%) of these had a documented swallowing dysfunction on VFSE.Eighty-eight percent suffered from pharyngeal dysfunction.The results have clinical implications and highlight the importance of asking for and examining swallowing function to prevent complications such as aspiration.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Memory Research unit, Dept of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Sweden. Elisabet.londos@skane.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: Dysphagia, which can result in aspiration pneumonia and death, is a well-known problem in patients with dementia and Parkinson's disease. There are few studies on dysphagia in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), especially studies objectively documenting the type of swallowing dysfunction. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the prevalence, and define the actual swallowing dysfunction according to a videofluoroscopic swallowing examination (VFSE) in patients with DLB and PDD.

Methods: Eighty-two consecutive patients with DLB or PDD in a clinical follow-up program were asked about symptoms of dysphagia. Those experiencing dysphagia were examined with VFSE. Prevalence and type of swallowing dysfunction was recorded.

Results: Twenty-six patients (32%) reported symptoms of dysphagia such as swallowing difficulties or coughing. Twenty-four (92%) of these had a documented swallowing dysfunction on VFSE. Eighty-eight percent suffered from pharyngeal dysfunction.

Conclusions: Almost all DLB or PDD patients with subjective signs of dysphagia had pathologic results on VFSE, the majority of pharyngeal type. This type of dysphagia has not been reported in DLB before. The results have clinical implications and highlight the importance of asking for and examining swallowing function to prevent complications such as aspiration.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of the study population and the prevalence of dysphagia.
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Figure 1: Flowchart of the study population and the prevalence of dysphagia.

Mentions: Of the 82 patients, 26 (32%) acknowledged dysphagia according to the two questions on swallowing problem and coughing (Figure 1). Twenty of these 26 patients suffered from DLB and 6 from PDD. There were no significant differences in demographic variables between the patient with and without dysphagia.


Dysphagia in Lewy body dementia - a clinical observational study of swallowing function by videofluoroscopic examination.

Londos E, Hanxsson O, Alm Hirsch I, Janneskog A, Bülow M, Palmqvist S - BMC Neurol (2013)

Flowchart of the study population and the prevalence of dysphagia.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126015&req=5

Figure 1: Flowchart of the study population and the prevalence of dysphagia.
Mentions: Of the 82 patients, 26 (32%) acknowledged dysphagia according to the two questions on swallowing problem and coughing (Figure 1). Twenty of these 26 patients suffered from DLB and 6 from PDD. There were no significant differences in demographic variables between the patient with and without dysphagia.

Bottom Line: Twenty-four (92%) of these had a documented swallowing dysfunction on VFSE.Eighty-eight percent suffered from pharyngeal dysfunction.The results have clinical implications and highlight the importance of asking for and examining swallowing function to prevent complications such as aspiration.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Memory Research unit, Dept of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Sweden. Elisabet.londos@skane.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: Dysphagia, which can result in aspiration pneumonia and death, is a well-known problem in patients with dementia and Parkinson's disease. There are few studies on dysphagia in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), especially studies objectively documenting the type of swallowing dysfunction. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the prevalence, and define the actual swallowing dysfunction according to a videofluoroscopic swallowing examination (VFSE) in patients with DLB and PDD.

Methods: Eighty-two consecutive patients with DLB or PDD in a clinical follow-up program were asked about symptoms of dysphagia. Those experiencing dysphagia were examined with VFSE. Prevalence and type of swallowing dysfunction was recorded.

Results: Twenty-six patients (32%) reported symptoms of dysphagia such as swallowing difficulties or coughing. Twenty-four (92%) of these had a documented swallowing dysfunction on VFSE. Eighty-eight percent suffered from pharyngeal dysfunction.

Conclusions: Almost all DLB or PDD patients with subjective signs of dysphagia had pathologic results on VFSE, the majority of pharyngeal type. This type of dysphagia has not been reported in DLB before. The results have clinical implications and highlight the importance of asking for and examining swallowing function to prevent complications such as aspiration.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus