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Bacterial cells enhance laser driven ion acceleration.

Dalui M, Kundu M, Trivikram TM, Rajeev R, Ray K, Krishnamurthy M - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration.Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics.We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005, India.

ABSTRACT
Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration. Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics. Here, we present a simple, albeit, unconventional target that succeeds in generating 700 keV carbon ions where conventional targets for the same laser parameters generate at most 40 keV. A few layers of micron sized bacteria coating on a polished surface increases the laser energy coupling and generates a hotter plasma which is more effective for the ion acceleration compared to the conventional polished targets. Particle-in-cell simulations show that micro-particle coated target are much more effective in ion acceleration as seen in the experiment. We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

MULTI-fs hydrodynamic simulation results.Dotted lines represent the carbon expansion from the polished target surface, which cannot be seen as it overlaps with the scatter plot. Spheres and asterisks show the hydrogen expansion from the polished glass and the microstructured target respectively.
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f5: MULTI-fs hydrodynamic simulation results.Dotted lines represent the carbon expansion from the polished target surface, which cannot be seen as it overlaps with the scatter plot. Spheres and asterisks show the hydrogen expansion from the polished glass and the microstructured target respectively.

Mentions: In the simulations, a constant pulse of 1 ns temporal duration propagating from the left to the right along the y-axis is taken to represent the pre-pulse (ASE). The target is a 25 μm thick solid substrate (made up of either hydrogen or carbon). The material density of hydrogen and carbon are taken to be 0.076 g/cc and 2.2 g/cc respectively. The pre-pulse intensity on the polished hydrogen and the carbon target is 2 × 1012 W/cm2. The micro-particle coated target is modelled as flat surface with a higher pre-pulse intensity (1013 W/cm2) to correspond to 5 times larger local fields generated in these targets. Figure 5 shows the ion density along the laser propagation direction for different kinds of targets, before the interaction of the main pulse. When the target is made up of only carbon, it suffers no difference due to the higher pre-pulse intensity. On the other hand for the target with the hydrogen there is a very noticeable motion of the hydrogen. The higher expansion of hydrogen prior to the arrival of the main fs pulse, due to the enhanced local fields in the micro-particle coated target would reduce the accelerating length and the electro-static sheath field experienced by these ions. So, the carbon ion expansion is negligible and hence, these ions are accelerated efficiently in the enhanced electro-static sheath.


Bacterial cells enhance laser driven ion acceleration.

Dalui M, Kundu M, Trivikram TM, Rajeev R, Ray K, Krishnamurthy M - Sci Rep (2014)

MULTI-fs hydrodynamic simulation results.Dotted lines represent the carbon expansion from the polished target surface, which cannot be seen as it overlaps with the scatter plot. Spheres and asterisks show the hydrogen expansion from the polished glass and the microstructured target respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126001&req=5

f5: MULTI-fs hydrodynamic simulation results.Dotted lines represent the carbon expansion from the polished target surface, which cannot be seen as it overlaps with the scatter plot. Spheres and asterisks show the hydrogen expansion from the polished glass and the microstructured target respectively.
Mentions: In the simulations, a constant pulse of 1 ns temporal duration propagating from the left to the right along the y-axis is taken to represent the pre-pulse (ASE). The target is a 25 μm thick solid substrate (made up of either hydrogen or carbon). The material density of hydrogen and carbon are taken to be 0.076 g/cc and 2.2 g/cc respectively. The pre-pulse intensity on the polished hydrogen and the carbon target is 2 × 1012 W/cm2. The micro-particle coated target is modelled as flat surface with a higher pre-pulse intensity (1013 W/cm2) to correspond to 5 times larger local fields generated in these targets. Figure 5 shows the ion density along the laser propagation direction for different kinds of targets, before the interaction of the main pulse. When the target is made up of only carbon, it suffers no difference due to the higher pre-pulse intensity. On the other hand for the target with the hydrogen there is a very noticeable motion of the hydrogen. The higher expansion of hydrogen prior to the arrival of the main fs pulse, due to the enhanced local fields in the micro-particle coated target would reduce the accelerating length and the electro-static sheath field experienced by these ions. So, the carbon ion expansion is negligible and hence, these ions are accelerated efficiently in the enhanced electro-static sheath.

Bottom Line: Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration.Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics.We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005, India.

ABSTRACT
Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration. Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics. Here, we present a simple, albeit, unconventional target that succeeds in generating 700 keV carbon ions where conventional targets for the same laser parameters generate at most 40 keV. A few layers of micron sized bacteria coating on a polished surface increases the laser energy coupling and generates a hotter plasma which is more effective for the ion acceleration compared to the conventional polished targets. Particle-in-cell simulations show that micro-particle coated target are much more effective in ion acceleration as seen in the experiment. We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus