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Bacterial cells enhance laser driven ion acceleration.

Dalui M, Kundu M, Trivikram TM, Rajeev R, Ray K, Krishnamurthy M - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration.Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics.We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005, India.

ABSTRACT
Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration. Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics. Here, we present a simple, albeit, unconventional target that succeeds in generating 700 keV carbon ions where conventional targets for the same laser parameters generate at most 40 keV. A few layers of micron sized bacteria coating on a polished surface increases the laser energy coupling and generates a hotter plasma which is more effective for the ion acceleration compared to the conventional polished targets. Particle-in-cell simulations show that micro-particle coated target are much more effective in ion acceleration as seen in the experiment. We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications.

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Proton energy measurements.Energy spectra of the protons derived from the TPS ion traces (figure 2a and 2b).
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f4: Proton energy measurements.Energy spectra of the protons derived from the TPS ion traces (figure 2a and 2b).

Mentions: The TP image also depicts a strong proton signal from both the targets. A comparison of the proton signals from both the targets is shown in figure 4. The maximum proton energy with the micro-particle coated target is not larger than the plain glass target, which is an apparent deviation from the analysis presented thus far. This anomaly in the proton acceleration in the E. coli coated target is because of the different expansion of hydrogen and carbon prior to the arrival of the main femtosecond laser pulse and is elaborated below.


Bacterial cells enhance laser driven ion acceleration.

Dalui M, Kundu M, Trivikram TM, Rajeev R, Ray K, Krishnamurthy M - Sci Rep (2014)

Proton energy measurements.Energy spectra of the protons derived from the TPS ion traces (figure 2a and 2b).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126001&req=5

f4: Proton energy measurements.Energy spectra of the protons derived from the TPS ion traces (figure 2a and 2b).
Mentions: The TP image also depicts a strong proton signal from both the targets. A comparison of the proton signals from both the targets is shown in figure 4. The maximum proton energy with the micro-particle coated target is not larger than the plain glass target, which is an apparent deviation from the analysis presented thus far. This anomaly in the proton acceleration in the E. coli coated target is because of the different expansion of hydrogen and carbon prior to the arrival of the main femtosecond laser pulse and is elaborated below.

Bottom Line: Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration.Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics.We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005, India.

ABSTRACT
Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration. Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics. Here, we present a simple, albeit, unconventional target that succeeds in generating 700 keV carbon ions where conventional targets for the same laser parameters generate at most 40 keV. A few layers of micron sized bacteria coating on a polished surface increases the laser energy coupling and generates a hotter plasma which is more effective for the ion acceleration compared to the conventional polished targets. Particle-in-cell simulations show that micro-particle coated target are much more effective in ion acceleration as seen in the experiment. We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications.

Show MeSH