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Porous perovskite LaNiO3 nanocubes as cathode catalysts for Li-O2 batteries with low charge potential.

Zhang J, Zhao Y, Zhao X, Liu Z, Chen W - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: The as-prepared battery showed excellent charging performance with significantly reduced overpotential (3.40 V).Furthermore, it was found that the lithium anode corrosion and cathode passivation were responsible for the capacity fading of Li-O2 battery.Our results indicated that porous LaNiO3 nanocubes represent a promising cathode catalyst for Li-O2 battery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543, Singapore.

ABSTRACT
Developing efficient catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for rechargeable Li-O2 battery. In our present work, porous LaNiO3 nanocubes were employed as electrocatalyst in Li-O2 battery cell. The as-prepared battery showed excellent charging performance with significantly reduced overpotential (3.40 V). The synergistic effect of porous structure, large specific surface area and high electrocatalytic activity of porous LaNiO3 nanocubes ensured the Li-O2 battery with enchanced capacity and good cycle stability. Furthermore, it was found that the lithium anode corrosion and cathode passivation were responsible for the capacity fading of Li-O2 battery. Our results indicated that porous LaNiO3 nanocubes represent a promising cathode catalyst for Li-O2 battery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) XRD pattern of the electrodes at different states of discharge and charge; (b) Raman spectra of electrodes at different states of discharge and charge; SEM images of the cathode electrode after (c)1st discharge, (d)1st charge, (e)3rd discharge and (f)3rd charge, respectively.
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f5: (a) XRD pattern of the electrodes at different states of discharge and charge; (b) Raman spectra of electrodes at different states of discharge and charge; SEM images of the cathode electrode after (c)1st discharge, (d)1st charge, (e)3rd discharge and (f)3rd charge, respectively.

Mentions: To explore the origin of the capacity decay,Raman spectroscopy, XRD and SEM measurements were conducted to analyze the cathode at different discharge-charge states. After 1st discharge, the discharge products coated on the surface of cathode homogeneously, as revealed by SEM image in Fig. 5c. These discharge products were evidenced to be Li2O2 based on the XRD pattern and Raman spectra (Fig. 5a and 5b)474849. After charge, the Li2O2 related peaks disappeared from the XRD pattern and Raman spectra (Fig. 5a and 5b), indicating that all Li2O2 was decomposed without any obvious Li2O2 residual. The morphology of the cathode surface after the 1st charge process (Fig. 5d) almost resembled that of the pristine electrode (Fig. S5), further confirming the complete decomposition of Li2O2 during the charge process. Similar trend was also observed by XRD and SEM measurement after the 3rd discharge-charge cycle (Fig. 5a, 5e and 5f). However, a weak Li2CO3 peak was observed in the Raman spectra after 3rd cycle (Fig. 5b). The Li2CO3 was proposed to originate from the unavoidable decomposition of electrolyte and unstable carbon components5051. These Li2CO3 could block the small pores in the cathode, which can cause the cathode passivation and result in the capacity fading.


Porous perovskite LaNiO3 nanocubes as cathode catalysts for Li-O2 batteries with low charge potential.

Zhang J, Zhao Y, Zhao X, Liu Z, Chen W - Sci Rep (2014)

(a) XRD pattern of the electrodes at different states of discharge and charge; (b) Raman spectra of electrodes at different states of discharge and charge; SEM images of the cathode electrode after (c)1st discharge, (d)1st charge, (e)3rd discharge and (f)3rd charge, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125986&req=5

f5: (a) XRD pattern of the electrodes at different states of discharge and charge; (b) Raman spectra of electrodes at different states of discharge and charge; SEM images of the cathode electrode after (c)1st discharge, (d)1st charge, (e)3rd discharge and (f)3rd charge, respectively.
Mentions: To explore the origin of the capacity decay,Raman spectroscopy, XRD and SEM measurements were conducted to analyze the cathode at different discharge-charge states. After 1st discharge, the discharge products coated on the surface of cathode homogeneously, as revealed by SEM image in Fig. 5c. These discharge products were evidenced to be Li2O2 based on the XRD pattern and Raman spectra (Fig. 5a and 5b)474849. After charge, the Li2O2 related peaks disappeared from the XRD pattern and Raman spectra (Fig. 5a and 5b), indicating that all Li2O2 was decomposed without any obvious Li2O2 residual. The morphology of the cathode surface after the 1st charge process (Fig. 5d) almost resembled that of the pristine electrode (Fig. S5), further confirming the complete decomposition of Li2O2 during the charge process. Similar trend was also observed by XRD and SEM measurement after the 3rd discharge-charge cycle (Fig. 5a, 5e and 5f). However, a weak Li2CO3 peak was observed in the Raman spectra after 3rd cycle (Fig. 5b). The Li2CO3 was proposed to originate from the unavoidable decomposition of electrolyte and unstable carbon components5051. These Li2CO3 could block the small pores in the cathode, which can cause the cathode passivation and result in the capacity fading.

Bottom Line: The as-prepared battery showed excellent charging performance with significantly reduced overpotential (3.40 V).Furthermore, it was found that the lithium anode corrosion and cathode passivation were responsible for the capacity fading of Li-O2 battery.Our results indicated that porous LaNiO3 nanocubes represent a promising cathode catalyst for Li-O2 battery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543, Singapore.

ABSTRACT
Developing efficient catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for rechargeable Li-O2 battery. In our present work, porous LaNiO3 nanocubes were employed as electrocatalyst in Li-O2 battery cell. The as-prepared battery showed excellent charging performance with significantly reduced overpotential (3.40 V). The synergistic effect of porous structure, large specific surface area and high electrocatalytic activity of porous LaNiO3 nanocubes ensured the Li-O2 battery with enchanced capacity and good cycle stability. Furthermore, it was found that the lithium anode corrosion and cathode passivation were responsible for the capacity fading of Li-O2 battery. Our results indicated that porous LaNiO3 nanocubes represent a promising cathode catalyst for Li-O2 battery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus