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Weight Loss Programs May Have Beneficial or Adverse Effects on Fat Mass and Insulin Sensitivity in Overweight and Obese Black Women.

Leon B, Miller BV, Zalos G, Courville AB, Sumner AE, Powell-Wiley TM, Walter MF, Waclawiw MA, Cannon RO - J Racial Ethn Health Disparities (2014)

Bottom Line: Weight loss interventions have produced little change in insulin sensitivity in black women, but mean data may obscure metabolic benefit to some and adverse effects for others.Baseline SI (range 0.74 to 7.58 l/mU(-1)•min(-1)) was inversely associated with fat mass (r = -0.516, p < 0.001), independent of age.Additional support for participants who fail to achieve fat mass loss early in an intervention may be required for success.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Building 10-CRC Room 5-3330, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Weight loss interventions have produced little change in insulin sensitivity in black women, but mean data may obscure metabolic benefit to some and adverse effects for others. Accordingly, we analyzed insulin sensitivity relative to fat mass change following a weight loss program.

Design and methods: Fifty-four black women (BMI range 25.9 to 54.7 kg/m(2)) completed the 6-month program that included nutrition information and worksite exercise facilities. Fat mass was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and insulin sensitivity index (SI) was calculated from an insulin-modified intravenous glucose tolerance test using the minimal model.

Results: Baseline SI (range 0.74 to 7.58 l/mU(-1)•min(-1)) was inversely associated with fat mass (r = -0.516, p < 0.001), independent of age. On average, subjects lost fat mass (baseline 40.8 ± 12.4 to 39.4 ± 12.6 kg [mean ± SD], P < 0.01), but 17 women (32 %) actually gained fat mass. SI for the group was unchanged (baseline 3.3 ± 1.7 to 3.2 ± 1.6, P = 0.67). However, the tertile with greatest fat mass loss (-3.6 kg, range -10.7 to -1.7 kg) improved insulin sensitivity (SI +0.3 ± 1.2), whereas the tertile with net fat mass gain (+0.9 kg, range -0.1 to +3.8 kg) had reduced insulin sensitivity (SI -0.7 ± 1.3) from baseline values (P < 0.05 by ANOVA).

Conclusions: Black women in a weight loss program who lose fat mass may have improved insulin sensitivity, but fat mass gain with diminished sensitivity is common. Additional support for participants who fail to achieve fat mass loss early in an intervention may be required for success.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Baseline correlations between insulin sensitivity index and total fat mass (top) and % truncal fat mass (bottom), adjusted for age
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Fig2: Baseline correlations between insulin sensitivity index and total fat mass (top) and % truncal fat mass (bottom), adjusted for age

Mentions: At baseline, SI for the 54 subjects ranged from 0.74 to 7.58 L•mU−1•min−1 and was inversely associated with total and % truncal fat masses when adjusted for age (Fig. 2). Additionally, SI was positively associated with exercise performance by VO2 peak at baseline (r = 0.448, P < 0.001). Leptin was positively associated with total fat mass (r = 0.652, P < 0.001) and % truncal fat mass (r = 0.643, P < 0.001), and inversely associated with SI (r = −0.492, P < 0.001). Adiponectin levels, however, were not related to baseline fat mass (either total or % truncal) or SI (all P > 0.208). Endogenous insulin response, AIRg, was positively associated with total fat mass (r = 0.310, P = 0.024) but not with % truncal fat mass (P = 0.200).Fig. 2


Weight Loss Programs May Have Beneficial or Adverse Effects on Fat Mass and Insulin Sensitivity in Overweight and Obese Black Women.

Leon B, Miller BV, Zalos G, Courville AB, Sumner AE, Powell-Wiley TM, Walter MF, Waclawiw MA, Cannon RO - J Racial Ethn Health Disparities (2014)

Baseline correlations between insulin sensitivity index and total fat mass (top) and % truncal fat mass (bottom), adjusted for age
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125812&req=5

Fig2: Baseline correlations between insulin sensitivity index and total fat mass (top) and % truncal fat mass (bottom), adjusted for age
Mentions: At baseline, SI for the 54 subjects ranged from 0.74 to 7.58 L•mU−1•min−1 and was inversely associated with total and % truncal fat masses when adjusted for age (Fig. 2). Additionally, SI was positively associated with exercise performance by VO2 peak at baseline (r = 0.448, P < 0.001). Leptin was positively associated with total fat mass (r = 0.652, P < 0.001) and % truncal fat mass (r = 0.643, P < 0.001), and inversely associated with SI (r = −0.492, P < 0.001). Adiponectin levels, however, were not related to baseline fat mass (either total or % truncal) or SI (all P > 0.208). Endogenous insulin response, AIRg, was positively associated with total fat mass (r = 0.310, P = 0.024) but not with % truncal fat mass (P = 0.200).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Weight loss interventions have produced little change in insulin sensitivity in black women, but mean data may obscure metabolic benefit to some and adverse effects for others.Baseline SI (range 0.74 to 7.58 l/mU(-1)•min(-1)) was inversely associated with fat mass (r = -0.516, p < 0.001), independent of age.Additional support for participants who fail to achieve fat mass loss early in an intervention may be required for success.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Building 10-CRC Room 5-3330, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Weight loss interventions have produced little change in insulin sensitivity in black women, but mean data may obscure metabolic benefit to some and adverse effects for others. Accordingly, we analyzed insulin sensitivity relative to fat mass change following a weight loss program.

Design and methods: Fifty-four black women (BMI range 25.9 to 54.7 kg/m(2)) completed the 6-month program that included nutrition information and worksite exercise facilities. Fat mass was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and insulin sensitivity index (SI) was calculated from an insulin-modified intravenous glucose tolerance test using the minimal model.

Results: Baseline SI (range 0.74 to 7.58 l/mU(-1)•min(-1)) was inversely associated with fat mass (r = -0.516, p < 0.001), independent of age. On average, subjects lost fat mass (baseline 40.8 ± 12.4 to 39.4 ± 12.6 kg [mean ± SD], P < 0.01), but 17 women (32 %) actually gained fat mass. SI for the group was unchanged (baseline 3.3 ± 1.7 to 3.2 ± 1.6, P = 0.67). However, the tertile with greatest fat mass loss (-3.6 kg, range -10.7 to -1.7 kg) improved insulin sensitivity (SI +0.3 ± 1.2), whereas the tertile with net fat mass gain (+0.9 kg, range -0.1 to +3.8 kg) had reduced insulin sensitivity (SI -0.7 ± 1.3) from baseline values (P < 0.05 by ANOVA).

Conclusions: Black women in a weight loss program who lose fat mass may have improved insulin sensitivity, but fat mass gain with diminished sensitivity is common. Additional support for participants who fail to achieve fat mass loss early in an intervention may be required for success.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus