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Interaction between physiological and subjective states predicts the effect of a judging panel on the postures of cellists in performance.

Endo S, Juhlberg K, Bradbury A, Wing AM - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: This study investigated the effect of a panel of judges on the movements and postures of cellists in performance.In contrast, the panel's presence had no reliable effect on their spatial accuracy.This highlights a need to distinguish performance anxiety from physiological arousal, to which end we advocate currency for the specific term performance arousal to describe heightened physiological activity in a performer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Chair of Information-Oriented Control, Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technische Universität München Munich, Germany ; SyMoN Lab, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham Birmingham, UK.

ABSTRACT
This study investigated the effect of a panel of judges on the movements and postures of cellists in performance. Twenty four expert cellists played a short piece of music, to a metronome beat, in the presence and absence of the panel. Kinematic analyses showed that in the presence of the panel the temporal execution of left arm shifting movements became less variable and closer to the metronome beat. In contrast, the panel's presence had no reliable effect on their spatial accuracy. A detailed postural analysis indicated that left elbow angle during execution of a given high note was correlated with level of heart rate, though the nature of this correlation was systematically affected by the relevant participant's subjective state: if anxious, a higher heart rate correlated with a more flexed elbow, if not anxious then with a more extended elbow. Our results suggest a change in physiological state alone does not reliably predict a change in behavior in performing cellists, which instead depends on the interaction between physiological state and subjective experience of anxiety. This highlights a need to distinguish performance anxiety from physiological arousal, to which end we advocate currency for the specific term performance arousal to describe heightened physiological activity in a performer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Means and variability of behavioral measures consisting of temporal deviations of the high note, spatial(finger) deviation of the High Note, and the elbow angle at the High Note. The standard deviation of the behavioral measures from each participant was log-transformed to correct for non-normal distribution. The error bars represent one standard errors.
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Figure 4: Means and variability of behavioral measures consisting of temporal deviations of the high note, spatial(finger) deviation of the High Note, and the elbow angle at the High Note. The standard deviation of the behavioral measures from each participant was log-transformed to correct for non-normal distribution. The error bars represent one standard errors.

Mentions: In general, the participants' shift movements undershot the High Notes as represented by the negative values in Figure 4. Changes in the degree of undershoot specific to presence of the Panel were not observed but it increased from the Pre-Panel to the Post-Panel stages in the order of experimental manipulation. With respect to the High Notes, the largest undershoot was observed at HN1 and the finger position was closest to the target at HN3. The ANOVA showed that there was a main effect of Audience, F(2, 46) = 6.04, p < 0.005. Pairwise comparisons revealed that there was a significant difference between the Pre- and Post-Panel stages (p < 0.005). A main effect of High Note was also found, F(2, 46) = 5.14, p < 0.10. Pairwise comparisons confirmed that the degree of undershoot at HN1 was significantly larger than at the remaining HNs (ps < 0.02). No interaction effect was found (p = 0.22). The size of variability was not affected by the Audience (p = 0.12) or the High Note (p = 0.30).


Interaction between physiological and subjective states predicts the effect of a judging panel on the postures of cellists in performance.

Endo S, Juhlberg K, Bradbury A, Wing AM - Front Psychol (2014)

Means and variability of behavioral measures consisting of temporal deviations of the high note, spatial(finger) deviation of the High Note, and the elbow angle at the High Note. The standard deviation of the behavioral measures from each participant was log-transformed to correct for non-normal distribution. The error bars represent one standard errors.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125750&req=5

Figure 4: Means and variability of behavioral measures consisting of temporal deviations of the high note, spatial(finger) deviation of the High Note, and the elbow angle at the High Note. The standard deviation of the behavioral measures from each participant was log-transformed to correct for non-normal distribution. The error bars represent one standard errors.
Mentions: In general, the participants' shift movements undershot the High Notes as represented by the negative values in Figure 4. Changes in the degree of undershoot specific to presence of the Panel were not observed but it increased from the Pre-Panel to the Post-Panel stages in the order of experimental manipulation. With respect to the High Notes, the largest undershoot was observed at HN1 and the finger position was closest to the target at HN3. The ANOVA showed that there was a main effect of Audience, F(2, 46) = 6.04, p < 0.005. Pairwise comparisons revealed that there was a significant difference between the Pre- and Post-Panel stages (p < 0.005). A main effect of High Note was also found, F(2, 46) = 5.14, p < 0.10. Pairwise comparisons confirmed that the degree of undershoot at HN1 was significantly larger than at the remaining HNs (ps < 0.02). No interaction effect was found (p = 0.22). The size of variability was not affected by the Audience (p = 0.12) or the High Note (p = 0.30).

Bottom Line: This study investigated the effect of a panel of judges on the movements and postures of cellists in performance.In contrast, the panel's presence had no reliable effect on their spatial accuracy.This highlights a need to distinguish performance anxiety from physiological arousal, to which end we advocate currency for the specific term performance arousal to describe heightened physiological activity in a performer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Chair of Information-Oriented Control, Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technische Universität München Munich, Germany ; SyMoN Lab, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham Birmingham, UK.

ABSTRACT
This study investigated the effect of a panel of judges on the movements and postures of cellists in performance. Twenty four expert cellists played a short piece of music, to a metronome beat, in the presence and absence of the panel. Kinematic analyses showed that in the presence of the panel the temporal execution of left arm shifting movements became less variable and closer to the metronome beat. In contrast, the panel's presence had no reliable effect on their spatial accuracy. A detailed postural analysis indicated that left elbow angle during execution of a given high note was correlated with level of heart rate, though the nature of this correlation was systematically affected by the relevant participant's subjective state: if anxious, a higher heart rate correlated with a more flexed elbow, if not anxious then with a more extended elbow. Our results suggest a change in physiological state alone does not reliably predict a change in behavior in performing cellists, which instead depends on the interaction between physiological state and subjective experience of anxiety. This highlights a need to distinguish performance anxiety from physiological arousal, to which end we advocate currency for the specific term performance arousal to describe heightened physiological activity in a performer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus