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Factors associated with parental non-adoption of infant male circumcision for HIV prevention in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and thematic synthesis.

Mavhu W, Mupambireyi Z, Hart G, Cowan FM - AIDS Behav (2014)

Bottom Line: Infant male circumcision (IMC) may be more effective at preventing HIV than adult male circumcision as the procedure is carried out before the individual becomes sexually active.Five descriptive themes were identified; these were later condensed into two main analytical themes: "poor knowledge" and "social constructs".Study findings are therefore likely to have broad implications for IMC roll out.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Sexual Health and HIV/AIDS Research (CeSHHAR) Zimbabwe, 9 Monmouth Road, Avondale, Harare, Zimbabwe, wmavhu@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Infant male circumcision (IMC) may be more effective at preventing HIV than adult male circumcision as the procedure is carried out before the individual becomes sexually active. Successful scale-up will depend on identifying and overcoming parental concerns that may act as barriers for IMC. We conducted a systematic review to identify qualitative studies reporting on parental reasons for non-adoption of IMC for HIV prevention in sub-Saharan Africa. Thematic synthesis was subsequently conducted. Five descriptive themes were identified; these were later condensed into two main analytical themes: "poor knowledge" and "social constructs". While barriers and motivators are to some degree context specific, this review suggests that there are common themes that need to be addressed across the region if uptake of IMC for HIV prevention is to be widely adopted. Study findings are therefore likely to have broad implications for IMC roll out.

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Selection of eligible papers
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig1: Selection of eligible papers

Mentions: Our search conducted to 22 January 2013 resulted in 320 hits, which included 177 duplicate articles. After removing duplicates, a further 128 were excluded based on the title and/or abstract review (see Fig. 1). Studies were excluded for at least one of the following reasons: [1] they reported only quantitative data, [2] they were conducted outside sub-Saharan Africa, and [3] they focused only on adult MC. The full article was read for the remaining 15 articles. Of these, five papers were excluded from the analysis because they failed to meet the inclusion criteria; four [31–34] because they focused on traditional adolescent MC and one [35] because it reported on norms and values around adult MC (see Fig. 1 for details of the selection process). Ten papers met the inclusion criteria and were assessed for quality and assigned a quality score ranging from poor to fair/good (see Table 2).Fig. 1


Factors associated with parental non-adoption of infant male circumcision for HIV prevention in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and thematic synthesis.

Mavhu W, Mupambireyi Z, Hart G, Cowan FM - AIDS Behav (2014)

Selection of eligible papers
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125745&req=5

Fig1: Selection of eligible papers
Mentions: Our search conducted to 22 January 2013 resulted in 320 hits, which included 177 duplicate articles. After removing duplicates, a further 128 were excluded based on the title and/or abstract review (see Fig. 1). Studies were excluded for at least one of the following reasons: [1] they reported only quantitative data, [2] they were conducted outside sub-Saharan Africa, and [3] they focused only on adult MC. The full article was read for the remaining 15 articles. Of these, five papers were excluded from the analysis because they failed to meet the inclusion criteria; four [31–34] because they focused on traditional adolescent MC and one [35] because it reported on norms and values around adult MC (see Fig. 1 for details of the selection process). Ten papers met the inclusion criteria and were assessed for quality and assigned a quality score ranging from poor to fair/good (see Table 2).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Infant male circumcision (IMC) may be more effective at preventing HIV than adult male circumcision as the procedure is carried out before the individual becomes sexually active.Five descriptive themes were identified; these were later condensed into two main analytical themes: "poor knowledge" and "social constructs".Study findings are therefore likely to have broad implications for IMC roll out.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Sexual Health and HIV/AIDS Research (CeSHHAR) Zimbabwe, 9 Monmouth Road, Avondale, Harare, Zimbabwe, wmavhu@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Infant male circumcision (IMC) may be more effective at preventing HIV than adult male circumcision as the procedure is carried out before the individual becomes sexually active. Successful scale-up will depend on identifying and overcoming parental concerns that may act as barriers for IMC. We conducted a systematic review to identify qualitative studies reporting on parental reasons for non-adoption of IMC for HIV prevention in sub-Saharan Africa. Thematic synthesis was subsequently conducted. Five descriptive themes were identified; these were later condensed into two main analytical themes: "poor knowledge" and "social constructs". While barriers and motivators are to some degree context specific, this review suggests that there are common themes that need to be addressed across the region if uptake of IMC for HIV prevention is to be widely adopted. Study findings are therefore likely to have broad implications for IMC roll out.

Show MeSH