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Single detection of human bocavirus 1 with a high viral load in severe respiratory tract infections in previously healthy children.

Zhou L, Zheng S, Xiao Q, Ren L, Xie X, Luo J, Wang L, Huang A, Liu W, Liu E - BMC Infect. Dis. (2014)

Bottom Line: At least one virus was detected in 652 (53.1%) of 1229 children, and two or more viruses were detected in 266 (21.6%) children.HBoV1 was detected in 127 children (10.3%), in which 66/127 (52%) of the cases were the only HBoV1 virus detected.There were no differences in the clinical symptoms and severity between HBoV1 single detection and co-detection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400014, P, R, China. emliu186@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Human bocavirus is a newly discovered parvovirus. Multiple studies have confirmed the presence of human bocavirus1 (HBoV1) in respiratory tract samples of children. The viral load, presentation of single detection and its role as a causative agent of severe respiratory tract infections have not been thoroughly elucidated.

Methods: We investigated the presence of HBoV1 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens from 1229 children hospitalized for respiratory tract infections. The samples were analyzed for 15 respiratory viruses by PCR and 7 respiratory viruses by viral culture.

Results: At least one virus was detected in 652 (53.1%) of 1229 children, and two or more viruses were detected in 266 (21.6%) children. HBoV1 was detected in 127 children (10.3%), in which 66/127 (52%) of the cases were the only HBoV1 virus detected. Seasonal variation was observed with a high HBoV1 infection rate in summer. A cutoff value of 107 copies/mL was used to distinguish high and low HBoV1 viral loads in the nasopharyngeal aspirates. High viral loads of HBoV1 were noted predominantly in the absence of other viral agents (28/39, 71.8%) whereas there was primarily co-detection in cases of low HBoV1 viral loads (50/88, 56.8%). There were no differences in the clinical symptoms and severity between HBoV1 single detection and co-detection. In cases of HBoV1 single detection, the high viral load group was more prevalent among children with dyspnea and wheezing than was the low viral load group (42.9% vs. 23.7%, P = 0.036; 60.7% vs. 31.6%, P = 0.018). In clinical severity, a significant difference was recorded (25.0% vs. 5.3%, P = 0.003) between high viral load and low viral load groups. Of the HBoV1 positive patients associated with severe respiratory tract infections, 10/18 (55.6%) patients belonged to the HBoV1 high viral load group, and 7/10 (70%) patients had cases of HBoV1 single detection.

Conclusions: HBoV1 at a high viral load is not frequently found in co-detection with other respiratory viruses, and a single detection with a high viral load could be an etiological agent of severe respiratory tract infections.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of the HBoV1 loads among 127 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples that tested positive for HBoV1. Each sample is represented by a single dot. The dotted line indicates the cutoff between the high and low HBoV1 load groups discussed in the text. The comparison in the mean viral load between HBoV1 high and low viral load groups were conducted by nonparametric Mann–Whitney U-test.
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Fig3: Distribution of the HBoV1 loads among 127 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples that tested positive for HBoV1. Each sample is represented by a single dot. The dotted line indicates the cutoff between the high and low HBoV1 load groups discussed in the text. The comparison in the mean viral load between HBoV1 high and low viral load groups were conducted by nonparametric Mann–Whitney U-test.

Mentions: The genome viral loads in the NPAs ranged from <500 to 3.8 × 1011 copies/mL of the sample material. The viral loads were assigned to 2 non-overlapping populations: one group of 39 samples with a high viral load (≥ 107 copies/mL) and the other group of 88 samples with a low viral load (<107 copies/mL). The median levels of the HBoV1 DNA genome in the respiratory samples were higher in the patients with a single HBoV1 detection than in the patients with a mixed respiratory viral infection with HBoV1 (1.95 × 106 copies/mL vs. 3.3 × 105 copies/mL, P = 0.195) (Figure 3).Figure 3


Single detection of human bocavirus 1 with a high viral load in severe respiratory tract infections in previously healthy children.

Zhou L, Zheng S, Xiao Q, Ren L, Xie X, Luo J, Wang L, Huang A, Liu W, Liu E - BMC Infect. Dis. (2014)

Distribution of the HBoV1 loads among 127 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples that tested positive for HBoV1. Each sample is represented by a single dot. The dotted line indicates the cutoff between the high and low HBoV1 load groups discussed in the text. The comparison in the mean viral load between HBoV1 high and low viral load groups were conducted by nonparametric Mann–Whitney U-test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125703&req=5

Fig3: Distribution of the HBoV1 loads among 127 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples that tested positive for HBoV1. Each sample is represented by a single dot. The dotted line indicates the cutoff between the high and low HBoV1 load groups discussed in the text. The comparison in the mean viral load between HBoV1 high and low viral load groups were conducted by nonparametric Mann–Whitney U-test.
Mentions: The genome viral loads in the NPAs ranged from <500 to 3.8 × 1011 copies/mL of the sample material. The viral loads were assigned to 2 non-overlapping populations: one group of 39 samples with a high viral load (≥ 107 copies/mL) and the other group of 88 samples with a low viral load (<107 copies/mL). The median levels of the HBoV1 DNA genome in the respiratory samples were higher in the patients with a single HBoV1 detection than in the patients with a mixed respiratory viral infection with HBoV1 (1.95 × 106 copies/mL vs. 3.3 × 105 copies/mL, P = 0.195) (Figure 3).Figure 3

Bottom Line: At least one virus was detected in 652 (53.1%) of 1229 children, and two or more viruses were detected in 266 (21.6%) children.HBoV1 was detected in 127 children (10.3%), in which 66/127 (52%) of the cases were the only HBoV1 virus detected.There were no differences in the clinical symptoms and severity between HBoV1 single detection and co-detection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400014, P, R, China. emliu186@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Human bocavirus is a newly discovered parvovirus. Multiple studies have confirmed the presence of human bocavirus1 (HBoV1) in respiratory tract samples of children. The viral load, presentation of single detection and its role as a causative agent of severe respiratory tract infections have not been thoroughly elucidated.

Methods: We investigated the presence of HBoV1 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens from 1229 children hospitalized for respiratory tract infections. The samples were analyzed for 15 respiratory viruses by PCR and 7 respiratory viruses by viral culture.

Results: At least one virus was detected in 652 (53.1%) of 1229 children, and two or more viruses were detected in 266 (21.6%) children. HBoV1 was detected in 127 children (10.3%), in which 66/127 (52%) of the cases were the only HBoV1 virus detected. Seasonal variation was observed with a high HBoV1 infection rate in summer. A cutoff value of 107 copies/mL was used to distinguish high and low HBoV1 viral loads in the nasopharyngeal aspirates. High viral loads of HBoV1 were noted predominantly in the absence of other viral agents (28/39, 71.8%) whereas there was primarily co-detection in cases of low HBoV1 viral loads (50/88, 56.8%). There were no differences in the clinical symptoms and severity between HBoV1 single detection and co-detection. In cases of HBoV1 single detection, the high viral load group was more prevalent among children with dyspnea and wheezing than was the low viral load group (42.9% vs. 23.7%, P = 0.036; 60.7% vs. 31.6%, P = 0.018). In clinical severity, a significant difference was recorded (25.0% vs. 5.3%, P = 0.003) between high viral load and low viral load groups. Of the HBoV1 positive patients associated with severe respiratory tract infections, 10/18 (55.6%) patients belonged to the HBoV1 high viral load group, and 7/10 (70%) patients had cases of HBoV1 single detection.

Conclusions: HBoV1 at a high viral load is not frequently found in co-detection with other respiratory viruses, and a single detection with a high viral load could be an etiological agent of severe respiratory tract infections.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus