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Steering teens safe: a randomized trial of a parent-based intervention to improve safe teen driving.

Peek-Asa C, Cavanaugh JE, Yang J, Chande V, Young T, Ramirez M - BMC Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: We assess the effectiveness of Steering Teens Safe, a parent-focused program to increase safe teen driving.Intervention teens ranked their parent's success in talking about driving safety higher than control teens (p = 0.035) and reported that their parents talked about more topics (non-significant difference).This program had a positive although not strong effect, and it may hold the most promise in partnership with other programs, such as Driver's Education or Graduated Driver's License policies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Iowa College of Public Health, 105 River St, S143B CPHB, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA. Corinne-peek-asa@uiowa.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Crashes are the leading cause of death for teens, and parent-based interventions are a promising approach. We assess the effectiveness of Steering Teens Safe, a parent-focused program to increase safe teen driving.

Methods: Steering Teens Safe aimed to improve parental communication with teens about safe driving using motivational interviewing techniques in conjunction with 19 safe driving lessons. A randomized controlled trial involved 145 parent-teen dyads (70 intervention and 75 control). Intervention parents received a 45-minute session to learn the program with four follow-up phone sessions, a DVD, and a workbook. Control parents received a standard brochure about safe driving. Scores were developed to measure teen-reported quantity and quality of parental communication about safe driving. The main outcome measure was a previously validated Risky Driving Score reported by teens. Because the Score was highly skewed, a generalized linear model based on a gamma distribution was used for analysis.

Results: Intervention teens ranked their parent's success in talking about driving safety higher than control teens (p = 0.035) and reported that their parents talked about more topics (non-significant difference). The Risky Driving Score was 21% lower in intervention compared to control teens (85% CI = 0.60, 1.00). Interaction between communication quantity and the intervention was examined. Intervention teens who reported more successful communication had a 42% lower Risky Driving Score (95% CI = 0.37, 0.94) than control parents with less successful communication.

Conclusions: This program had a positive although not strong effect, and it may hold the most promise in partnership with other programs, such as Driver's Education or Graduated Driver's License policies.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01014923. Registered Nov. 16, 2009.

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CONSORT diagram.
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Fig1: CONSORT diagram.

Mentions: The proposed sample size to achieve 90% power to detect a risky driving score difference of 20% was 176 parent/teen dyads with 88 in each study arm. Using our passive enrollment protocol, a total of 336 potential participants provided contact information for follow-up (Figure 1). Of these, 52 were ineligible (mostly due to delayed licensure), 48 refused, and we were unable to contact 73; the remaining 163 (48.5%) parent/teen dyads consented/assented to enroll in the study. The final sample size, based on teen one- and six-month follow-up surveys analyzed here, was 145, with 70 (84.5% follow-up) in the intervention arm and 75 (93.8% follow-up) in the control arm (Figure 1).Figure 1


Steering teens safe: a randomized trial of a parent-based intervention to improve safe teen driving.

Peek-Asa C, Cavanaugh JE, Yang J, Chande V, Young T, Ramirez M - BMC Public Health (2014)

CONSORT diagram.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125695&req=5

Fig1: CONSORT diagram.
Mentions: The proposed sample size to achieve 90% power to detect a risky driving score difference of 20% was 176 parent/teen dyads with 88 in each study arm. Using our passive enrollment protocol, a total of 336 potential participants provided contact information for follow-up (Figure 1). Of these, 52 were ineligible (mostly due to delayed licensure), 48 refused, and we were unable to contact 73; the remaining 163 (48.5%) parent/teen dyads consented/assented to enroll in the study. The final sample size, based on teen one- and six-month follow-up surveys analyzed here, was 145, with 70 (84.5% follow-up) in the intervention arm and 75 (93.8% follow-up) in the control arm (Figure 1).Figure 1

Bottom Line: We assess the effectiveness of Steering Teens Safe, a parent-focused program to increase safe teen driving.Intervention teens ranked their parent's success in talking about driving safety higher than control teens (p = 0.035) and reported that their parents talked about more topics (non-significant difference).This program had a positive although not strong effect, and it may hold the most promise in partnership with other programs, such as Driver's Education or Graduated Driver's License policies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Iowa College of Public Health, 105 River St, S143B CPHB, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA. Corinne-peek-asa@uiowa.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Crashes are the leading cause of death for teens, and parent-based interventions are a promising approach. We assess the effectiveness of Steering Teens Safe, a parent-focused program to increase safe teen driving.

Methods: Steering Teens Safe aimed to improve parental communication with teens about safe driving using motivational interviewing techniques in conjunction with 19 safe driving lessons. A randomized controlled trial involved 145 parent-teen dyads (70 intervention and 75 control). Intervention parents received a 45-minute session to learn the program with four follow-up phone sessions, a DVD, and a workbook. Control parents received a standard brochure about safe driving. Scores were developed to measure teen-reported quantity and quality of parental communication about safe driving. The main outcome measure was a previously validated Risky Driving Score reported by teens. Because the Score was highly skewed, a generalized linear model based on a gamma distribution was used for analysis.

Results: Intervention teens ranked their parent's success in talking about driving safety higher than control teens (p = 0.035) and reported that their parents talked about more topics (non-significant difference). The Risky Driving Score was 21% lower in intervention compared to control teens (85% CI = 0.60, 1.00). Interaction between communication quantity and the intervention was examined. Intervention teens who reported more successful communication had a 42% lower Risky Driving Score (95% CI = 0.37, 0.94) than control parents with less successful communication.

Conclusions: This program had a positive although not strong effect, and it may hold the most promise in partnership with other programs, such as Driver's Education or Graduated Driver's License policies.

Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01014923. Registered Nov. 16, 2009.

Show MeSH