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Effects of a pre-and post-workout protein-carbohydrate supplement in trained crossfit individuals.

Outlaw JJ, Wilborn CD, Smith-Ryan AE, Hayward SE, Urbina SL, Taylor LW, Foster CA - Springerplus (2014)

Bottom Line: The purpose was to assess effects of a pre- and a post-workout protein-carbohydrate supplement on CrossFit-specific performance and body composition.VO2MAX, WPP, and WOD2 results revealed that the pre/post supplements were likely beneficial after 95% Confidence Intervals and Magnitude Inferences analysis.The combination of proprietary supplements taken for 6 weeks may provide benefits during certain sport-specific performance in trained CrossFit athletes but not others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Performance Lab, Exercise and Sport Science Department, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, 900 College Street, Belton, TX 76513 USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose was to assess effects of a pre- and a post-workout protein-carbohydrate supplement on CrossFit-specific performance and body composition.

Methods: In an open label randomized study, 13 male and 16 female trained Crossfit participants (mean ± SD; age: 31.87 ± 7.61 yrs, weight: 78.68 ± 16.45 kg, percent body fat: 21.97 ± 9.02) were assessed at 0 and 6 weeks for body composition, VO2max, Wingate peak (WPP) and mean power (WMP), in addition to sport-specific workouts (WOD1: 500 m row, 40 wall balls, 30 push-ups, 20 box jumps, 10 thrusters for time; WOD2: 15 minutes to complete an 800 m run "buy in", followed by as many rounds as possible (AMRAP) of 5 burpees, 10 Kettlebell swings, 15 air squats). The supplement (SUP) group consisted of 19 g of a pre-workout drink (extracts of pomegranate, tart cherry, green and black tea) taken 30 minutes before and a post-workout protein (females: 20 g; males: 40 g) and carbohydrate (females: 40 g; males: 80 g) supplement consumed immediately after each workout. The control (CTL) group consumed only water one hour before or after workouts. Participants completed three (minimum) varied workouts per week at a CrossFit gym as typical to habitual training throughout the six week study. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA (p <0 .05), 95% Confidence Intervals, and Magnitude Inferences.

Results: There were no time × group interactions for body composition, WMP, or WOD1 based on ANOVA statistics. VO2MAX, WPP, and WOD2 results revealed that the pre/post supplements were likely beneficial after 95% Confidence Intervals and Magnitude Inferences analysis.

Conclusion: The combination of proprietary supplements taken for 6 weeks may provide benefits during certain sport-specific performance in trained CrossFit athletes but not others.

No MeSH data available.


WOD1, measured in time, improved for both groups and there was no significant difference between SUP and CTL. WOD2 performance likely benefited from the supplement for SUP based on magnitude inferences. There was no significant difference between groups. WOD1: workout of the day 1, SUP: supplement, CTL: control, WOD2: workout of the day 2.
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Fig3: WOD1, measured in time, improved for both groups and there was no significant difference between SUP and CTL. WOD2 performance likely benefited from the supplement for SUP based on magnitude inferences. There was no significant difference between groups. WOD1: workout of the day 1, SUP: supplement, CTL: control, WOD2: workout of the day 2.

Mentions: The pre-workout supplement plus the post-workout protein had likely beneficial effects on VO2MAX (78.16%) during recovery period and Wingate peak power (73.40%) over the duration of the intervention timeframe based on statistical analysis (magnitude inferences and 95% confidence intervals). VO2MAX was maintained from T1 to T2 for SUP whereas VO2MAX decreased from T1 to T2 (Figure 1). Wingate peak power changes were also significant based on 95% Confidence Intervals. The performance in WOD1 and WOD2 were potentially meaningful with mean performance improvements in time in WOD1 of -38.79 sec (SUP; 5.85%) vs -8.62 sec (CTL; 2.39%) and +16.79 reps (SUP: 10.01%) vs +6.31 reps (CTL; 2.41%) in AMRAP in WOD2. Although the time to completion was not determined to be significantly different for WOD1 T1 to T2, changes in WOD2 performance were likely beneficial (84.95%) for the supplement group according to magnitude inferences (SUP: +9.59 ± 10.91 W; CTL: -0.88 ± 18.25 W). Wingate mean power values can be seen in Figure 2, WOD1 and WOD 2 data is presented in Figure 3.Figure 1


Effects of a pre-and post-workout protein-carbohydrate supplement in trained crossfit individuals.

Outlaw JJ, Wilborn CD, Smith-Ryan AE, Hayward SE, Urbina SL, Taylor LW, Foster CA - Springerplus (2014)

WOD1, measured in time, improved for both groups and there was no significant difference between SUP and CTL. WOD2 performance likely benefited from the supplement for SUP based on magnitude inferences. There was no significant difference between groups. WOD1: workout of the day 1, SUP: supplement, CTL: control, WOD2: workout of the day 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125607&req=5

Fig3: WOD1, measured in time, improved for both groups and there was no significant difference between SUP and CTL. WOD2 performance likely benefited from the supplement for SUP based on magnitude inferences. There was no significant difference between groups. WOD1: workout of the day 1, SUP: supplement, CTL: control, WOD2: workout of the day 2.
Mentions: The pre-workout supplement plus the post-workout protein had likely beneficial effects on VO2MAX (78.16%) during recovery period and Wingate peak power (73.40%) over the duration of the intervention timeframe based on statistical analysis (magnitude inferences and 95% confidence intervals). VO2MAX was maintained from T1 to T2 for SUP whereas VO2MAX decreased from T1 to T2 (Figure 1). Wingate peak power changes were also significant based on 95% Confidence Intervals. The performance in WOD1 and WOD2 were potentially meaningful with mean performance improvements in time in WOD1 of -38.79 sec (SUP; 5.85%) vs -8.62 sec (CTL; 2.39%) and +16.79 reps (SUP: 10.01%) vs +6.31 reps (CTL; 2.41%) in AMRAP in WOD2. Although the time to completion was not determined to be significantly different for WOD1 T1 to T2, changes in WOD2 performance were likely beneficial (84.95%) for the supplement group according to magnitude inferences (SUP: +9.59 ± 10.91 W; CTL: -0.88 ± 18.25 W). Wingate mean power values can be seen in Figure 2, WOD1 and WOD 2 data is presented in Figure 3.Figure 1

Bottom Line: The purpose was to assess effects of a pre- and a post-workout protein-carbohydrate supplement on CrossFit-specific performance and body composition.VO2MAX, WPP, and WOD2 results revealed that the pre/post supplements were likely beneficial after 95% Confidence Intervals and Magnitude Inferences analysis.The combination of proprietary supplements taken for 6 weeks may provide benefits during certain sport-specific performance in trained CrossFit athletes but not others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Performance Lab, Exercise and Sport Science Department, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, 900 College Street, Belton, TX 76513 USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose was to assess effects of a pre- and a post-workout protein-carbohydrate supplement on CrossFit-specific performance and body composition.

Methods: In an open label randomized study, 13 male and 16 female trained Crossfit participants (mean ± SD; age: 31.87 ± 7.61 yrs, weight: 78.68 ± 16.45 kg, percent body fat: 21.97 ± 9.02) were assessed at 0 and 6 weeks for body composition, VO2max, Wingate peak (WPP) and mean power (WMP), in addition to sport-specific workouts (WOD1: 500 m row, 40 wall balls, 30 push-ups, 20 box jumps, 10 thrusters for time; WOD2: 15 minutes to complete an 800 m run "buy in", followed by as many rounds as possible (AMRAP) of 5 burpees, 10 Kettlebell swings, 15 air squats). The supplement (SUP) group consisted of 19 g of a pre-workout drink (extracts of pomegranate, tart cherry, green and black tea) taken 30 minutes before and a post-workout protein (females: 20 g; males: 40 g) and carbohydrate (females: 40 g; males: 80 g) supplement consumed immediately after each workout. The control (CTL) group consumed only water one hour before or after workouts. Participants completed three (minimum) varied workouts per week at a CrossFit gym as typical to habitual training throughout the six week study. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA (p <0 .05), 95% Confidence Intervals, and Magnitude Inferences.

Results: There were no time × group interactions for body composition, WMP, or WOD1 based on ANOVA statistics. VO2MAX, WPP, and WOD2 results revealed that the pre/post supplements were likely beneficial after 95% Confidence Intervals and Magnitude Inferences analysis.

Conclusion: The combination of proprietary supplements taken for 6 weeks may provide benefits during certain sport-specific performance in trained CrossFit athletes but not others.

No MeSH data available.