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Effects of a pre-and post-workout protein-carbohydrate supplement in trained crossfit individuals.

Outlaw JJ, Wilborn CD, Smith-Ryan AE, Hayward SE, Urbina SL, Taylor LW, Foster CA - Springerplus (2014)

Bottom Line: The purpose was to assess effects of a pre- and a post-workout protein-carbohydrate supplement on CrossFit-specific performance and body composition.VO2MAX, WPP, and WOD2 results revealed that the pre/post supplements were likely beneficial after 95% Confidence Intervals and Magnitude Inferences analysis.The combination of proprietary supplements taken for 6 weeks may provide benefits during certain sport-specific performance in trained CrossFit athletes but not others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Performance Lab, Exercise and Sport Science Department, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, 900 College Street, Belton, TX 76513 USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose was to assess effects of a pre- and a post-workout protein-carbohydrate supplement on CrossFit-specific performance and body composition.

Methods: In an open label randomized study, 13 male and 16 female trained Crossfit participants (mean ± SD; age: 31.87 ± 7.61 yrs, weight: 78.68 ± 16.45 kg, percent body fat: 21.97 ± 9.02) were assessed at 0 and 6 weeks for body composition, VO2max, Wingate peak (WPP) and mean power (WMP), in addition to sport-specific workouts (WOD1: 500 m row, 40 wall balls, 30 push-ups, 20 box jumps, 10 thrusters for time; WOD2: 15 minutes to complete an 800 m run "buy in", followed by as many rounds as possible (AMRAP) of 5 burpees, 10 Kettlebell swings, 15 air squats). The supplement (SUP) group consisted of 19 g of a pre-workout drink (extracts of pomegranate, tart cherry, green and black tea) taken 30 minutes before and a post-workout protein (females: 20 g; males: 40 g) and carbohydrate (females: 40 g; males: 80 g) supplement consumed immediately after each workout. The control (CTL) group consumed only water one hour before or after workouts. Participants completed three (minimum) varied workouts per week at a CrossFit gym as typical to habitual training throughout the six week study. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA (p <0 .05), 95% Confidence Intervals, and Magnitude Inferences.

Results: There were no time × group interactions for body composition, WMP, or WOD1 based on ANOVA statistics. VO2MAX, WPP, and WOD2 results revealed that the pre/post supplements were likely beneficial after 95% Confidence Intervals and Magnitude Inferences analysis.

Conclusion: The combination of proprietary supplements taken for 6 weeks may provide benefits during certain sport-specific performance in trained CrossFit athletes but not others.

No MeSH data available.


Magnitude inferences revealed that the supplements had a likely beneficial effect on the changes that occurred in the SUP group. There was a significant difference between groups (confidence intervals). * represents p ≤ 0.05. SUP: supplement.
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Fig2: Magnitude inferences revealed that the supplements had a likely beneficial effect on the changes that occurred in the SUP group. There was a significant difference between groups (confidence intervals). * represents p ≤ 0.05. SUP: supplement.

Mentions: The pre-workout supplement plus the post-workout protein had likely beneficial effects on VO2MAX (78.16%) during recovery period and Wingate peak power (73.40%) over the duration of the intervention timeframe based on statistical analysis (magnitude inferences and 95% confidence intervals). VO2MAX was maintained from T1 to T2 for SUP whereas VO2MAX decreased from T1 to T2 (Figure 1). Wingate peak power changes were also significant based on 95% Confidence Intervals. The performance in WOD1 and WOD2 were potentially meaningful with mean performance improvements in time in WOD1 of -38.79 sec (SUP; 5.85%) vs -8.62 sec (CTL; 2.39%) and +16.79 reps (SUP: 10.01%) vs +6.31 reps (CTL; 2.41%) in AMRAP in WOD2. Although the time to completion was not determined to be significantly different for WOD1 T1 to T2, changes in WOD2 performance were likely beneficial (84.95%) for the supplement group according to magnitude inferences (SUP: +9.59 ± 10.91 W; CTL: -0.88 ± 18.25 W). Wingate mean power values can be seen in Figure 2, WOD1 and WOD 2 data is presented in Figure 3.Figure 1


Effects of a pre-and post-workout protein-carbohydrate supplement in trained crossfit individuals.

Outlaw JJ, Wilborn CD, Smith-Ryan AE, Hayward SE, Urbina SL, Taylor LW, Foster CA - Springerplus (2014)

Magnitude inferences revealed that the supplements had a likely beneficial effect on the changes that occurred in the SUP group. There was a significant difference between groups (confidence intervals). * represents p ≤ 0.05. SUP: supplement.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125607&req=5

Fig2: Magnitude inferences revealed that the supplements had a likely beneficial effect on the changes that occurred in the SUP group. There was a significant difference between groups (confidence intervals). * represents p ≤ 0.05. SUP: supplement.
Mentions: The pre-workout supplement plus the post-workout protein had likely beneficial effects on VO2MAX (78.16%) during recovery period and Wingate peak power (73.40%) over the duration of the intervention timeframe based on statistical analysis (magnitude inferences and 95% confidence intervals). VO2MAX was maintained from T1 to T2 for SUP whereas VO2MAX decreased from T1 to T2 (Figure 1). Wingate peak power changes were also significant based on 95% Confidence Intervals. The performance in WOD1 and WOD2 were potentially meaningful with mean performance improvements in time in WOD1 of -38.79 sec (SUP; 5.85%) vs -8.62 sec (CTL; 2.39%) and +16.79 reps (SUP: 10.01%) vs +6.31 reps (CTL; 2.41%) in AMRAP in WOD2. Although the time to completion was not determined to be significantly different for WOD1 T1 to T2, changes in WOD2 performance were likely beneficial (84.95%) for the supplement group according to magnitude inferences (SUP: +9.59 ± 10.91 W; CTL: -0.88 ± 18.25 W). Wingate mean power values can be seen in Figure 2, WOD1 and WOD 2 data is presented in Figure 3.Figure 1

Bottom Line: The purpose was to assess effects of a pre- and a post-workout protein-carbohydrate supplement on CrossFit-specific performance and body composition.VO2MAX, WPP, and WOD2 results revealed that the pre/post supplements were likely beneficial after 95% Confidence Intervals and Magnitude Inferences analysis.The combination of proprietary supplements taken for 6 weeks may provide benefits during certain sport-specific performance in trained CrossFit athletes but not others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Performance Lab, Exercise and Sport Science Department, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, 900 College Street, Belton, TX 76513 USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose was to assess effects of a pre- and a post-workout protein-carbohydrate supplement on CrossFit-specific performance and body composition.

Methods: In an open label randomized study, 13 male and 16 female trained Crossfit participants (mean ± SD; age: 31.87 ± 7.61 yrs, weight: 78.68 ± 16.45 kg, percent body fat: 21.97 ± 9.02) were assessed at 0 and 6 weeks for body composition, VO2max, Wingate peak (WPP) and mean power (WMP), in addition to sport-specific workouts (WOD1: 500 m row, 40 wall balls, 30 push-ups, 20 box jumps, 10 thrusters for time; WOD2: 15 minutes to complete an 800 m run "buy in", followed by as many rounds as possible (AMRAP) of 5 burpees, 10 Kettlebell swings, 15 air squats). The supplement (SUP) group consisted of 19 g of a pre-workout drink (extracts of pomegranate, tart cherry, green and black tea) taken 30 minutes before and a post-workout protein (females: 20 g; males: 40 g) and carbohydrate (females: 40 g; males: 80 g) supplement consumed immediately after each workout. The control (CTL) group consumed only water one hour before or after workouts. Participants completed three (minimum) varied workouts per week at a CrossFit gym as typical to habitual training throughout the six week study. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA (p <0 .05), 95% Confidence Intervals, and Magnitude Inferences.

Results: There were no time × group interactions for body composition, WMP, or WOD1 based on ANOVA statistics. VO2MAX, WPP, and WOD2 results revealed that the pre/post supplements were likely beneficial after 95% Confidence Intervals and Magnitude Inferences analysis.

Conclusion: The combination of proprietary supplements taken for 6 weeks may provide benefits during certain sport-specific performance in trained CrossFit athletes but not others.

No MeSH data available.