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An esthetic appliance for the management of crown-root fracture: a case report.

Jeon SM, Lee KH, Jung BY - Restor Dent Endod (2014)

Bottom Line: However, clinicians often encounter cases where the bonding required for tooth traction is not possible because the adjacent teeth have been restored with ceramic or veneer.The modified appliance was fabricated using an artificial tooth, clear plastic sheeting, and a braided fiber-reinforced composite strip that covered adjacent teeth without bonding.It satisfied the esthetic and functional needs of the patient and established the optimal biologic width.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Advanced General Dentistry, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Orthodontic extrusion is usually performed by means of a fixed orthodontic appliance that utilizes arch wire attached to adjacent teeth and transfers the desired force by elastic from the wire to the root. However, clinicians often encounter cases where the bonding required for tooth traction is not possible because the adjacent teeth have been restored with ceramic or veneer. The purpose of this case report is to describe a modified orthodontic extrusion appliance that is useful when conventional orthodontic treatment is not possible. The modified appliance was fabricated using an artificial tooth, clear plastic sheeting, and a braided fiber-reinforced composite strip that covered adjacent teeth without bonding. It satisfied the esthetic and functional needs of the patient and established the optimal biologic width.

No MeSH data available.


Elastic thread engaged between the loop wire of the root portion and the fiber-reinforced composite strip.
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Figure 4: Elastic thread engaged between the loop wire of the root portion and the fiber-reinforced composite strip.

Mentions: In the laboratory, an artificial tooth was set on the left central incisor area on the model and a clear appliance was fabricated using a plastic sheet (Bioplast, Scheu-Dental GmbH, Iserlohn, Germany) in the anterior teeth area. The artificial tooth was removed from the clear appliance and trimmed to leave only the labial shell. The labial shell of the artificial tooth was attached inside the clear appliance for esthetic maintenance. A window was formed on the palatal side of the left central incisor area of the clear appliance. A braided fiber-reinforced composite strip of 2 mm in diameter (Fiber Force, Synca, Le Gardeur, QC, Canada) was bonded to the inner surface of the window as a scaffold to increase the strength of the anchor (Figure 3). An elastic thread was engaged to the loop wire in the root and the horizontal bar of the clear appliance, and activated with a 50 g force after a piece of wire (0.032 inch in diameter) ending in a loop was affixed to the prepared root using glass ionomer cement (Figure 4). The occlusal interference due to the appliance was controlled by cutting the plastic sheet on the contact area of the centric stops. To avoid food impaction or foreign body entrapping, the window was covered with temporary filling material leaving the tooth space empty (Figures 5 and 6).


An esthetic appliance for the management of crown-root fracture: a case report.

Jeon SM, Lee KH, Jung BY - Restor Dent Endod (2014)

Elastic thread engaged between the loop wire of the root portion and the fiber-reinforced composite strip.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125588&req=5

Figure 4: Elastic thread engaged between the loop wire of the root portion and the fiber-reinforced composite strip.
Mentions: In the laboratory, an artificial tooth was set on the left central incisor area on the model and a clear appliance was fabricated using a plastic sheet (Bioplast, Scheu-Dental GmbH, Iserlohn, Germany) in the anterior teeth area. The artificial tooth was removed from the clear appliance and trimmed to leave only the labial shell. The labial shell of the artificial tooth was attached inside the clear appliance for esthetic maintenance. A window was formed on the palatal side of the left central incisor area of the clear appliance. A braided fiber-reinforced composite strip of 2 mm in diameter (Fiber Force, Synca, Le Gardeur, QC, Canada) was bonded to the inner surface of the window as a scaffold to increase the strength of the anchor (Figure 3). An elastic thread was engaged to the loop wire in the root and the horizontal bar of the clear appliance, and activated with a 50 g force after a piece of wire (0.032 inch in diameter) ending in a loop was affixed to the prepared root using glass ionomer cement (Figure 4). The occlusal interference due to the appliance was controlled by cutting the plastic sheet on the contact area of the centric stops. To avoid food impaction or foreign body entrapping, the window was covered with temporary filling material leaving the tooth space empty (Figures 5 and 6).

Bottom Line: However, clinicians often encounter cases where the bonding required for tooth traction is not possible because the adjacent teeth have been restored with ceramic or veneer.The modified appliance was fabricated using an artificial tooth, clear plastic sheeting, and a braided fiber-reinforced composite strip that covered adjacent teeth without bonding.It satisfied the esthetic and functional needs of the patient and established the optimal biologic width.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Advanced General Dentistry, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Orthodontic extrusion is usually performed by means of a fixed orthodontic appliance that utilizes arch wire attached to adjacent teeth and transfers the desired force by elastic from the wire to the root. However, clinicians often encounter cases where the bonding required for tooth traction is not possible because the adjacent teeth have been restored with ceramic or veneer. The purpose of this case report is to describe a modified orthodontic extrusion appliance that is useful when conventional orthodontic treatment is not possible. The modified appliance was fabricated using an artificial tooth, clear plastic sheeting, and a braided fiber-reinforced composite strip that covered adjacent teeth without bonding. It satisfied the esthetic and functional needs of the patient and established the optimal biologic width.

No MeSH data available.