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Can surgical management of bone metastases improve quality of life among women with gynecologic cancer?

Ji T, Eskander R, Wang Y, Sun K, Hoang BH, Guo W - World J Surg Oncol (2014)

Bottom Line: Patients were followed for an average period of 13.8 months (range, 2 to 34 months).The mean VAS score was 5.8 preoperatively compared with 2.1, 3 months after surgery.The mean pre and postoperative ECOG performance status grades were 3.1 and 2.3, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Musculoskeletal Tumor Center, People's Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100044, China. bonetumor@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The evaluation, counseling, and management of gynecologic patients with bone metastasis remain a challenge for clinicians. In order to critically evaluate the role of surgery, we retrospectively analyzed the records of 18 patients surgically treated for metastatic gynecologic tumors of bone, focusing on quality of life, local tumor control, and survival.

Methods: Eighteen patients underwent surgical procedures for the treatment of bone metastases secondary to gynecologic cancer between September 2003 and April 2012. The primary cancer sites included the uterus (n = 10), the cervix (n = 5), and an ovary (n = 3). Patients were followed for an average period of 13.8 months (range, 2 to 34 months). A visual analog pain scale (VAS) and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status were evaluated both pre- and postoperatively.

Results: The median survival time following diagnosis of bone metastasis was 10.0 months. The mean VAS score was 5.8 preoperatively compared with 2.1, 3 months after surgery. The mean pre and postoperative ECOG performance status grades were 3.1 and 2.3, respectively.

Conclusions: The prognosis of gynecological cancer patients with bone metastasis is poor. Some patients had improvement in their quality of life after surgical intervention for bone metastases; however, novel integrated treatment modalities should be investigated.

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The Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed patients’ survival after bone metastases from gynecological malignancies. The median survival time from diagnosis of bone metastasis was 10.0 months (95% confidence interval (CI), 3.8 to 16.2 months).
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Figure 2: The Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed patients’ survival after bone metastases from gynecological malignancies. The median survival time from diagnosis of bone metastasis was 10.0 months (95% confidence interval (CI), 3.8 to 16.2 months).

Mentions: At completion of data collection, 15 patients were dead of primary disease, and 2 patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence. One patient (patient 16) developed pulmonary metastasis 19 months after femur surgery and is alive with disease. New bone lesions occurred in two patients (patient 5 and 8) during the follow-up and no simultaneous surgical intervention was performed. The survival curve for the 18 patients is shown in Figure 2. The median survival time following diagnosis of bone metastasis was 10.0 months (95% CI, 3.8 go 16.2 months). The estimated 1-year survival was 44.4%. The eight patients with endometrial carcinoma had a median survival of 10.0 months (95% CI 0 to 22.5 months), patients with cervical cancer 6.0 months (95% CI 4.9 to 7.1 months), and ovarian carcinoma 8.0 months (95% CI 4.8 to 11.2 months).


Can surgical management of bone metastases improve quality of life among women with gynecologic cancer?

Ji T, Eskander R, Wang Y, Sun K, Hoang BH, Guo W - World J Surg Oncol (2014)

The Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed patients’ survival after bone metastases from gynecological malignancies. The median survival time from diagnosis of bone metastasis was 10.0 months (95% confidence interval (CI), 3.8 to 16.2 months).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125343&req=5

Figure 2: The Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed patients’ survival after bone metastases from gynecological malignancies. The median survival time from diagnosis of bone metastasis was 10.0 months (95% confidence interval (CI), 3.8 to 16.2 months).
Mentions: At completion of data collection, 15 patients were dead of primary disease, and 2 patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence. One patient (patient 16) developed pulmonary metastasis 19 months after femur surgery and is alive with disease. New bone lesions occurred in two patients (patient 5 and 8) during the follow-up and no simultaneous surgical intervention was performed. The survival curve for the 18 patients is shown in Figure 2. The median survival time following diagnosis of bone metastasis was 10.0 months (95% CI, 3.8 go 16.2 months). The estimated 1-year survival was 44.4%. The eight patients with endometrial carcinoma had a median survival of 10.0 months (95% CI 0 to 22.5 months), patients with cervical cancer 6.0 months (95% CI 4.9 to 7.1 months), and ovarian carcinoma 8.0 months (95% CI 4.8 to 11.2 months).

Bottom Line: Patients were followed for an average period of 13.8 months (range, 2 to 34 months).The mean VAS score was 5.8 preoperatively compared with 2.1, 3 months after surgery.The mean pre and postoperative ECOG performance status grades were 3.1 and 2.3, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Musculoskeletal Tumor Center, People's Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100044, China. bonetumor@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The evaluation, counseling, and management of gynecologic patients with bone metastasis remain a challenge for clinicians. In order to critically evaluate the role of surgery, we retrospectively analyzed the records of 18 patients surgically treated for metastatic gynecologic tumors of bone, focusing on quality of life, local tumor control, and survival.

Methods: Eighteen patients underwent surgical procedures for the treatment of bone metastases secondary to gynecologic cancer between September 2003 and April 2012. The primary cancer sites included the uterus (n = 10), the cervix (n = 5), and an ovary (n = 3). Patients were followed for an average period of 13.8 months (range, 2 to 34 months). A visual analog pain scale (VAS) and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status were evaluated both pre- and postoperatively.

Results: The median survival time following diagnosis of bone metastasis was 10.0 months. The mean VAS score was 5.8 preoperatively compared with 2.1, 3 months after surgery. The mean pre and postoperative ECOG performance status grades were 3.1 and 2.3, respectively.

Conclusions: The prognosis of gynecological cancer patients with bone metastasis is poor. Some patients had improvement in their quality of life after surgical intervention for bone metastases; however, novel integrated treatment modalities should be investigated.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus