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Recurrent arterial and venous thromboemboli as initial presentation of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

Trottier-Tellier F, Durand M, Kolan C, Wistaff R, Nguyen PV, Laskine M - J Clin Med Res (2014)

Bottom Line: This treatment regimen led to a complete remission and absence of relapse of the thrombosis or APL during the follow-up.To our knowledge, this presentation is the second case in the literature.We use this opportunity to emphasize the importance of performing a complete medical evaluation in cases of unusual thromboembolic events.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Canada.

ABSTRACT
We report a case of a 52-year-old Caucasian woman diagnosed with a synchronic arterial and venous thrombosis as an initial presentation of an acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). After the diagnosis, the patient was treated with all trans-retinoic acid and arsenic chemotherapy concomitant to systemic anticoagulation. This treatment regimen led to a complete remission and absence of relapse of the thrombosis or APL during the follow-up. To our knowledge, this presentation is the second case in the literature. We use this opportunity to emphasize the importance of performing a complete medical evaluation in cases of unusual thromboembolic events.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CAT scan showing thrombosis of the left subclavian and axillary arteries.
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Figure 1: CAT scan showing thrombosis of the left subclavian and axillary arteries.

Mentions: Local thrombolysis was performed twice again over the next 10 days because of recurrent episodes of left arm ischemia with thrombi progression in the brachial, radial and ulnar arteries. The decision to switch to IV argatroban was made due to repeated episodes of thrombosis with therapeutic levels of IV heparin, thus suspecting a “heparin resistance” (Fig. 1).


Recurrent arterial and venous thromboemboli as initial presentation of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

Trottier-Tellier F, Durand M, Kolan C, Wistaff R, Nguyen PV, Laskine M - J Clin Med Res (2014)

CAT scan showing thrombosis of the left subclavian and axillary arteries.
© Copyright Policy - open access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125336&req=5

Figure 1: CAT scan showing thrombosis of the left subclavian and axillary arteries.
Mentions: Local thrombolysis was performed twice again over the next 10 days because of recurrent episodes of left arm ischemia with thrombi progression in the brachial, radial and ulnar arteries. The decision to switch to IV argatroban was made due to repeated episodes of thrombosis with therapeutic levels of IV heparin, thus suspecting a “heparin resistance” (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: This treatment regimen led to a complete remission and absence of relapse of the thrombosis or APL during the follow-up.To our knowledge, this presentation is the second case in the literature.We use this opportunity to emphasize the importance of performing a complete medical evaluation in cases of unusual thromboembolic events.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Canada.

ABSTRACT
We report a case of a 52-year-old Caucasian woman diagnosed with a synchronic arterial and venous thrombosis as an initial presentation of an acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). After the diagnosis, the patient was treated with all trans-retinoic acid and arsenic chemotherapy concomitant to systemic anticoagulation. This treatment regimen led to a complete remission and absence of relapse of the thrombosis or APL during the follow-up. To our knowledge, this presentation is the second case in the literature. We use this opportunity to emphasize the importance of performing a complete medical evaluation in cases of unusual thromboembolic events.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus