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Influences on modern multifactorial falls prevention interventions and fear of falling in non-frail older adults: a literature review.

Svantesson U, Babagbemi B, Foster L, Alricsson M - J Clin Med Res (2014)

Bottom Line: Multifactorial interventions were assessed in terms of their program content, design, demographics, implementation techniques, and cost-effectiveness.Falls are a common, but preventable, cause of morbidity and injury in older adults 65 and over.In addition to physiological variables, fear of falling and self-efficacy are psychosocial factors that impact the incidence of falls in this population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology/Physiotherapy, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, SE 405 30 Goteborg, Sweden ; Mid Sweden University, Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre, Department of health Science, SE 83125 Ostersund, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
This review explores underlying features that may influence fear of falling and the effectiveness of multifactorial falls prevention programs in community dwelling non-frail adults aged 65 and older. It also examines the interrelationship between fear of falling and multifactorial falls prevention interventions. A literature search of medical databases was conducted to identify articles that address the fear of falling and multifactorial programs as either a primary or secondary component of their findings. Multifactorial interventions were assessed in terms of their program content, design, demographics, implementation techniques, and cost-effectiveness. Falls are a common, but preventable, cause of morbidity and injury in older adults 65 and over. In addition to physiological variables, fear of falling and self-efficacy are psychosocial factors that impact the incidence of falls in this population. Addressing fear of falling in addition to physiological parameters may influence the success of multifactorial falls prevention programs for adults 65 and over.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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Mentions: A total of 551 articles were retrieved from all databases searched for this review. Articles were selected for evaluation based on the relevance of their abstracts and titles to the research foci, fear of falling and multifactorial falls prevention programs targeted at community dwelling and functionally independent older adults over the age of 65 (Fig. 1). This study combined results from both quantitative and qualitative research studies to explore what influences multifactorial falls prevention programs and fear of falling and the interrelationship between fear of falling and the effectiveness of multifactorial falls prevention programs for older, non-frail, community dwelling adults aged 65 and older. A total of 26 articles were selected for the review. Twelve articles met results inclusion criteria. One addressed fear of falling through the falls efficacy scale (FES) [11], while three others addressed fear of falling related to balanced control [12-14]. Two focused on fear of falling in relationship to multicomponent falls prevention intervention programs [10, 15]. Three focused on the effectiveness of multifactorial interventions in comparison to other interventions such as physical exercise, guidance counseling, individual focused advice and standard care [3, 5, 7]. Two articles addressed multifactorial programs from the standpoint of cost-effectiveness [16, 17]. One study explored how older adults cope with falls and what motivates them to participate in falls prevention programs [18]. Analysis of the results revealed interrelationships between definitions, concepts, program constructs, designs, strengths, weaknesses, self-efficacy, and complexity of multifaceted dimensions related to fear of falling and multifactorial falls prevention programs for non-frail, functionally independent, older adults aged 65 and over (Fig. 1).


Influences on modern multifactorial falls prevention interventions and fear of falling in non-frail older adults: a literature review.

Svantesson U, Babagbemi B, Foster L, Alricsson M - J Clin Med Res (2014)

Article screening flow chart.
© Copyright Policy - open access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125325&req=5

Figure 1: Article screening flow chart.
Mentions: A total of 551 articles were retrieved from all databases searched for this review. Articles were selected for evaluation based on the relevance of their abstracts and titles to the research foci, fear of falling and multifactorial falls prevention programs targeted at community dwelling and functionally independent older adults over the age of 65 (Fig. 1). This study combined results from both quantitative and qualitative research studies to explore what influences multifactorial falls prevention programs and fear of falling and the interrelationship between fear of falling and the effectiveness of multifactorial falls prevention programs for older, non-frail, community dwelling adults aged 65 and older. A total of 26 articles were selected for the review. Twelve articles met results inclusion criteria. One addressed fear of falling through the falls efficacy scale (FES) [11], while three others addressed fear of falling related to balanced control [12-14]. Two focused on fear of falling in relationship to multicomponent falls prevention intervention programs [10, 15]. Three focused on the effectiveness of multifactorial interventions in comparison to other interventions such as physical exercise, guidance counseling, individual focused advice and standard care [3, 5, 7]. Two articles addressed multifactorial programs from the standpoint of cost-effectiveness [16, 17]. One study explored how older adults cope with falls and what motivates them to participate in falls prevention programs [18]. Analysis of the results revealed interrelationships between definitions, concepts, program constructs, designs, strengths, weaknesses, self-efficacy, and complexity of multifaceted dimensions related to fear of falling and multifactorial falls prevention programs for non-frail, functionally independent, older adults aged 65 and over (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Multifactorial interventions were assessed in terms of their program content, design, demographics, implementation techniques, and cost-effectiveness.Falls are a common, but preventable, cause of morbidity and injury in older adults 65 and over.In addition to physiological variables, fear of falling and self-efficacy are psychosocial factors that impact the incidence of falls in this population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology/Physiotherapy, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, SE 405 30 Goteborg, Sweden ; Mid Sweden University, Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre, Department of health Science, SE 83125 Ostersund, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
This review explores underlying features that may influence fear of falling and the effectiveness of multifactorial falls prevention programs in community dwelling non-frail adults aged 65 and older. It also examines the interrelationship between fear of falling and multifactorial falls prevention interventions. A literature search of medical databases was conducted to identify articles that address the fear of falling and multifactorial programs as either a primary or secondary component of their findings. Multifactorial interventions were assessed in terms of their program content, design, demographics, implementation techniques, and cost-effectiveness. Falls are a common, but preventable, cause of morbidity and injury in older adults 65 and over. In addition to physiological variables, fear of falling and self-efficacy are psychosocial factors that impact the incidence of falls in this population. Addressing fear of falling in addition to physiological parameters may influence the success of multifactorial falls prevention programs for adults 65 and over.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus