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Identification of tick-borne pathogens in ticks feeding on humans in Turkey.

Orkun Ö, Karaer Z, Çakmak A, Nalbantoğlu S - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: In addition, B. crassa, for which limited information is available on its distribution and vector species, and B. occultans, for which no conclusive information is available on its presence in Turkey, were identified in Ha. parva and H. marginatum, respectively.More epidemiological studies are warranted for B. rossi, which is very pathogenic for dogs, because the presented results suggest that B. rossi might have a wide distribution in Turkey.Furthermore, we recommend that tick-borne pathogens, especially R. aeschlimannii, R. slovaca, and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, should be taken into consideration in patients who had a tick bite in Turkey.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Background: The importance of tick-borne diseases is increasing all over the world, including Turkey. The tick-borne disease outbreaks reported in recent years and the abundance of tick species and the existence of suitable habitats increase the importance of studies related to the epidemiology of ticks and tick-borne pathogens in Turkey. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of and to determine the infection rates of some tick-borne pathogens, including Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group rickettsiae in the ticks removed from humans in different parts of Ankara.

Methodology/principal findings: A total of 169 ticks belonging to the genus Haemaphysalis, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus were collected by removing from humans in different parts of Ankara. Ticks were molecularly screened for Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group rickettsiae by PCR and sequencing analysis. We detected 4 Babesia spp.; B. crassa, B. major, B. occultans and B. rossi, one Borrelia spp.; B. burgdorferi sensu stricto and 3 spotted fever group rickettsiae; R. aeschlimannii, R. slovaca and R. hoogstraalii in the tick specimens analyzed. This is the report showing the presence of B. rossi in a region that is out of Africa and in the host species Ha. parva. In addition, B. crassa, for which limited information is available on its distribution and vector species, and B. occultans, for which no conclusive information is available on its presence in Turkey, were identified in Ha. parva and H. marginatum, respectively. Two human pathogenic rickettsia species (R. aeschlimannii and R. slovaca) were detected with a high prevalence in ticks. Additionally, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto was detected in unusual tick species (H. marginatum, H. excavatum, Hyalomma spp. (nymph) and Ha. parva).

Conclusions/significance: This study investigates both the distribution of several tick-borne pathogens affecting humans and animals, and the presence of new tick-borne pathogens in Turkey. More epidemiological studies are warranted for B. rossi, which is very pathogenic for dogs, because the presented results suggest that B. rossi might have a wide distribution in Turkey. Furthermore, we recommend that tick-borne pathogens, especially R. aeschlimannii, R. slovaca, and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, should be taken into consideration in patients who had a tick bite in Turkey.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Map showing the location of Ankara province and study area.
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pntd-0003067-g001: Map showing the location of Ankara province and study area.

Mentions: This study was conducted in Ankara, the capital city of Turkey. Ankara province is located in Central Anatolia (Fig. 1) and is the second largest city in the county. Ankara is about 24.500 km2 and the population of the city is close to 5 million. Half of the total area (approximately 12.000 km2) is used as agricultural land. Different habitats; forest, steppe, wetlands, and salty soils are encountered in Ankara. The average annual precipitation is 242–612 mm., while the average annual temperature is 10.3–14.7°C. Ankara is under the influence of semi-arid and very cold Mediterranean climate. A large part of the province is covered with steppe. The elevation is between 550 and 2000 meters [18]. In rural areas, cattle and sheep breeding are commonly made partially intensive but mostly in pasturelands. Goat breeding is limited to some villages and goats are generally pastured while mixed with sheep. Wild animals such as wild boar, hare, fox, and ground-feeding birds (partridge, crow etc.), which are also called amplifying hosts for ticks, are abundant throughout the province.


Identification of tick-borne pathogens in ticks feeding on humans in Turkey.

Orkun Ö, Karaer Z, Çakmak A, Nalbantoğlu S - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2014)

Map showing the location of Ankara province and study area.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125308&req=5

pntd-0003067-g001: Map showing the location of Ankara province and study area.
Mentions: This study was conducted in Ankara, the capital city of Turkey. Ankara province is located in Central Anatolia (Fig. 1) and is the second largest city in the county. Ankara is about 24.500 km2 and the population of the city is close to 5 million. Half of the total area (approximately 12.000 km2) is used as agricultural land. Different habitats; forest, steppe, wetlands, and salty soils are encountered in Ankara. The average annual precipitation is 242–612 mm., while the average annual temperature is 10.3–14.7°C. Ankara is under the influence of semi-arid and very cold Mediterranean climate. A large part of the province is covered with steppe. The elevation is between 550 and 2000 meters [18]. In rural areas, cattle and sheep breeding are commonly made partially intensive but mostly in pasturelands. Goat breeding is limited to some villages and goats are generally pastured while mixed with sheep. Wild animals such as wild boar, hare, fox, and ground-feeding birds (partridge, crow etc.), which are also called amplifying hosts for ticks, are abundant throughout the province.

Bottom Line: In addition, B. crassa, for which limited information is available on its distribution and vector species, and B. occultans, for which no conclusive information is available on its presence in Turkey, were identified in Ha. parva and H. marginatum, respectively.More epidemiological studies are warranted for B. rossi, which is very pathogenic for dogs, because the presented results suggest that B. rossi might have a wide distribution in Turkey.Furthermore, we recommend that tick-borne pathogens, especially R. aeschlimannii, R. slovaca, and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, should be taken into consideration in patients who had a tick bite in Turkey.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Background: The importance of tick-borne diseases is increasing all over the world, including Turkey. The tick-borne disease outbreaks reported in recent years and the abundance of tick species and the existence of suitable habitats increase the importance of studies related to the epidemiology of ticks and tick-borne pathogens in Turkey. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of and to determine the infection rates of some tick-borne pathogens, including Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group rickettsiae in the ticks removed from humans in different parts of Ankara.

Methodology/principal findings: A total of 169 ticks belonging to the genus Haemaphysalis, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus were collected by removing from humans in different parts of Ankara. Ticks were molecularly screened for Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group rickettsiae by PCR and sequencing analysis. We detected 4 Babesia spp.; B. crassa, B. major, B. occultans and B. rossi, one Borrelia spp.; B. burgdorferi sensu stricto and 3 spotted fever group rickettsiae; R. aeschlimannii, R. slovaca and R. hoogstraalii in the tick specimens analyzed. This is the report showing the presence of B. rossi in a region that is out of Africa and in the host species Ha. parva. In addition, B. crassa, for which limited information is available on its distribution and vector species, and B. occultans, for which no conclusive information is available on its presence in Turkey, were identified in Ha. parva and H. marginatum, respectively. Two human pathogenic rickettsia species (R. aeschlimannii and R. slovaca) were detected with a high prevalence in ticks. Additionally, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto was detected in unusual tick species (H. marginatum, H. excavatum, Hyalomma spp. (nymph) and Ha. parva).

Conclusions/significance: This study investigates both the distribution of several tick-borne pathogens affecting humans and animals, and the presence of new tick-borne pathogens in Turkey. More epidemiological studies are warranted for B. rossi, which is very pathogenic for dogs, because the presented results suggest that B. rossi might have a wide distribution in Turkey. Furthermore, we recommend that tick-borne pathogens, especially R. aeschlimannii, R. slovaca, and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, should be taken into consideration in patients who had a tick bite in Turkey.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus