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The association of early childhood cognitive development and behavioural difficulties with pre-adolescent problematic eating attitudes.

Richmond RC, Skugarevsky O, Yang S, Kramer MS, Wade KH, Patel R, Bogdanovich N, Vilchuck K, Sergeichick N, Smith GD, Oken E, Martin RM - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: No such association was observed in girls (1.01; 0.93, 1.10) (p for sex-interaction = 0.016).In both boys and girls, teacher-assessed academic performance in non-verbal subjects was inversely associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per unit increase in mathematics ability = 0.88; 0.82, 0.94; and OR per unit increase in ability for other non-verbal subjects = 0.86; 0.79, 0.94).Behavioural difficulties were positively associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per SD increase in teacher-assessed rating = 1.13; 1.07, 1.19).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (IEU), University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Few studies have prospectively investigated associations of child cognitive ability and behavioural difficulties with later eating attitudes. We investigated associations of intelligence quotient (IQ), academic performance and behavioural difficulties at 6.5 years with eating attitudes five years later.

Methods: We conducted an observational cohort study nested within the Promotion of Breastfeeding Intervention Trial, Belarus. Of 17,046 infants enrolled at birth, 13,751 (80.7%) completed the Children's Eating Attitude Test (ChEAT) at 11.5 years, most with information on IQ (n = 12,667), academic performance (n = 9,954) and behavioural difficulties (n = 11,098) at 6.5 years. The main outcome was a ChEAT score ≥ 85th percentile, indicative of problematic eating attitudes.

Results: Boys with higher IQ at 6.5 years reported fewer problematic eating attitudes, as assessed by ChEAT scores ≥ 85th percentile, at 11.5 years (OR per SD increase in full-scale IQ = 0.87; 0.79, 0.94). No such association was observed in girls (1.01; 0.93, 1.10) (p for sex-interaction = 0.016). In both boys and girls, teacher-assessed academic performance in non-verbal subjects was inversely associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per unit increase in mathematics ability = 0.88; 0.82, 0.94; and OR per unit increase in ability for other non-verbal subjects = 0.86; 0.79, 0.94). Behavioural difficulties were positively associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per SD increase in teacher-assessed rating = 1.13; 1.07, 1.19).

Conclusion: Lower IQ, worse non-verbal academic performance and behavioural problems at early school age are positively associated with risk of problematic eating attitudes in early adolescence.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart of participant sample sizes for each exposure, PROBIT cohort.*Sample size varies depending on the completeness of data collection for each of the sub-areas of the cognitive/behavioural assessments. Final numbers included in the analyses were reduced slightly due to some missingness of the covariables.
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pone-0104132-g001: Flow chart of participant sample sizes for each exposure, PROBIT cohort.*Sample size varies depending on the completeness of data collection for each of the sub-areas of the cognitive/behavioural assessments. Final numbers included in the analyses were reduced slightly due to some missingness of the covariables.

Mentions: Of the 17,046 children enrolled in the original trial, a total of 13,879 (81.4%) were seen at age 11.5 years (IQR 11.3–11.8) and 13,751 (80.7%) had complete and useable responses to the ChEAT questionnaire (6675 girls and 7076 boys). Complete cases analysis was used throughout and so the sample sizes on which our analyses are based vary depending on the completeness of data collection when the children were aged 6.5 years (Figure 1). A comparison of characteristics of the mother-infant pairs that were not followed-up and of those who were followed-up when the offspring were age 11.5 years has been previously published.[41] Mothers who did not attend the follow-up visit were slightly younger at the time of birth of their infant, were slightly less likely to have partly completed university or advanced secondary education, and were more likely to have smoked during pregnancy, and the study child was more likely to have been their first child.


The association of early childhood cognitive development and behavioural difficulties with pre-adolescent problematic eating attitudes.

Richmond RC, Skugarevsky O, Yang S, Kramer MS, Wade KH, Patel R, Bogdanovich N, Vilchuck K, Sergeichick N, Smith GD, Oken E, Martin RM - PLoS ONE (2014)

Flow chart of participant sample sizes for each exposure, PROBIT cohort.*Sample size varies depending on the completeness of data collection for each of the sub-areas of the cognitive/behavioural assessments. Final numbers included in the analyses were reduced slightly due to some missingness of the covariables.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125275&req=5

pone-0104132-g001: Flow chart of participant sample sizes for each exposure, PROBIT cohort.*Sample size varies depending on the completeness of data collection for each of the sub-areas of the cognitive/behavioural assessments. Final numbers included in the analyses were reduced slightly due to some missingness of the covariables.
Mentions: Of the 17,046 children enrolled in the original trial, a total of 13,879 (81.4%) were seen at age 11.5 years (IQR 11.3–11.8) and 13,751 (80.7%) had complete and useable responses to the ChEAT questionnaire (6675 girls and 7076 boys). Complete cases analysis was used throughout and so the sample sizes on which our analyses are based vary depending on the completeness of data collection when the children were aged 6.5 years (Figure 1). A comparison of characteristics of the mother-infant pairs that were not followed-up and of those who were followed-up when the offspring were age 11.5 years has been previously published.[41] Mothers who did not attend the follow-up visit were slightly younger at the time of birth of their infant, were slightly less likely to have partly completed university or advanced secondary education, and were more likely to have smoked during pregnancy, and the study child was more likely to have been their first child.

Bottom Line: No such association was observed in girls (1.01; 0.93, 1.10) (p for sex-interaction = 0.016).In both boys and girls, teacher-assessed academic performance in non-verbal subjects was inversely associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per unit increase in mathematics ability = 0.88; 0.82, 0.94; and OR per unit increase in ability for other non-verbal subjects = 0.86; 0.79, 0.94).Behavioural difficulties were positively associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per SD increase in teacher-assessed rating = 1.13; 1.07, 1.19).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (IEU), University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Few studies have prospectively investigated associations of child cognitive ability and behavioural difficulties with later eating attitudes. We investigated associations of intelligence quotient (IQ), academic performance and behavioural difficulties at 6.5 years with eating attitudes five years later.

Methods: We conducted an observational cohort study nested within the Promotion of Breastfeeding Intervention Trial, Belarus. Of 17,046 infants enrolled at birth, 13,751 (80.7%) completed the Children's Eating Attitude Test (ChEAT) at 11.5 years, most with information on IQ (n = 12,667), academic performance (n = 9,954) and behavioural difficulties (n = 11,098) at 6.5 years. The main outcome was a ChEAT score ≥ 85th percentile, indicative of problematic eating attitudes.

Results: Boys with higher IQ at 6.5 years reported fewer problematic eating attitudes, as assessed by ChEAT scores ≥ 85th percentile, at 11.5 years (OR per SD increase in full-scale IQ = 0.87; 0.79, 0.94). No such association was observed in girls (1.01; 0.93, 1.10) (p for sex-interaction = 0.016). In both boys and girls, teacher-assessed academic performance in non-verbal subjects was inversely associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per unit increase in mathematics ability = 0.88; 0.82, 0.94; and OR per unit increase in ability for other non-verbal subjects = 0.86; 0.79, 0.94). Behavioural difficulties were positively associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per SD increase in teacher-assessed rating = 1.13; 1.07, 1.19).

Conclusion: Lower IQ, worse non-verbal academic performance and behavioural problems at early school age are positively associated with risk of problematic eating attitudes in early adolescence.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus