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Integrated community case management of childhood illness in Ethiopia: implementation strength and quality of care.

Miller NP, Amouzou A, Tafesse M, Hazel E, Legesse H, Degefie T, Victora CG, Black RE, Bryce J - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Bottom Line: HEWs provided correct case management for 64% of children.The proportions of children correctly managed for pneumonia, diarrhea, and malnutrition were 72%, 79%, and 59%, respectively.Health posts saw an average of 16 sick children in the previous 1 month.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for International Programs, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; ABH Services, PLC, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Ethiopia Country Office, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil nmiller@jhsph.edu.

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Clinical errors analysis for children with uncomplicated illnesses in intervention areas in Jimma and West Hararghe Zones, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. ORT = oral rehydration therapy.
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Figure 1: Clinical errors analysis for children with uncomplicated illnesses in intervention areas in Jimma and West Hararghe Zones, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. ORT = oral rehydration therapy.

Mentions: Figures 1 and 2 present analyses of clinical errors for children with uncomplicated illness only and children with at least one severe illness in intervention areas, respectively. Around one-third of children were assessed for all 11 selected signs and symptoms of iCCM illnesses. The most common assessment errors were failures to assess convulsions, edema, and lethargy. Incorrect classification of pneumonia was the most common classification error for children with uncomplicated illness, partially because of incorrect assessment of fast breathing. The most common treatment errors were failure to give cotrimoxazole to children with pneumonia and failure to give ORS for diarrhea, although these items were in stock. Misclassification was common among children with severe illness, and incorrect treatment was common regardless of whether children were correctly classified. The most common treatment errors for children with severe illness were failure to give the first dose of cotrimoxazole for pneumonia, failure to give the first doses of amoxicillin and vitamin A for severe complicated malnutrition, and not referring children to health centers when it was required.


Integrated community case management of childhood illness in Ethiopia: implementation strength and quality of care.

Miller NP, Amouzou A, Tafesse M, Hazel E, Legesse H, Degefie T, Victora CG, Black RE, Bryce J - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Clinical errors analysis for children with uncomplicated illnesses in intervention areas in Jimma and West Hararghe Zones, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. ORT = oral rehydration therapy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125273&req=5

Figure 1: Clinical errors analysis for children with uncomplicated illnesses in intervention areas in Jimma and West Hararghe Zones, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. ORT = oral rehydration therapy.
Mentions: Figures 1 and 2 present analyses of clinical errors for children with uncomplicated illness only and children with at least one severe illness in intervention areas, respectively. Around one-third of children were assessed for all 11 selected signs and symptoms of iCCM illnesses. The most common assessment errors were failures to assess convulsions, edema, and lethargy. Incorrect classification of pneumonia was the most common classification error for children with uncomplicated illness, partially because of incorrect assessment of fast breathing. The most common treatment errors were failure to give cotrimoxazole to children with pneumonia and failure to give ORS for diarrhea, although these items were in stock. Misclassification was common among children with severe illness, and incorrect treatment was common regardless of whether children were correctly classified. The most common treatment errors for children with severe illness were failure to give the first dose of cotrimoxazole for pneumonia, failure to give the first doses of amoxicillin and vitamin A for severe complicated malnutrition, and not referring children to health centers when it was required.

Bottom Line: HEWs provided correct case management for 64% of children.The proportions of children correctly managed for pneumonia, diarrhea, and malnutrition were 72%, 79%, and 59%, respectively.Health posts saw an average of 16 sick children in the previous 1 month.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for International Programs, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; ABH Services, PLC, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Ethiopia Country Office, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil nmiller@jhsph.edu.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus