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Placental malaria is rare among Zanzibari pregnant women who did not receive intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy.

Plotkin M, Said K, Msellem MI, Chase RP, Hendler N, Khamis AR, Roman E, Kitojo C, Schwartz AC, Gutman J, McElroy PD - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Bottom Line: Dried placental blood spot specimens were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); 9 of 1,349 specimens (0.7%; precision estimate = 0.2-1.1%) were PCR-positive for Plasmodium falciparum.Placental infection was detected on both Pemba (N = 3) and Unguja (N = 6).It may be reasonable for the Ministry of Health to consider discontinuing IPTp, intensifying surveillance efforts, and promoting insecticide-treated nets and effective case management of malaria in pregnancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jhpiego Tanzania, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Zanzibar Malaria Elimination Programme Zanzibar Ministry of Health, Tanzania; Jhpiego Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of International Health, John Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California; US President's Malaria Initiative and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Tanzania, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia Marya.Plotkin@jhpiego.org.

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Placental malaria infection cases in Pemba and Unguja, Zanzibar.
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Figure 2: Placental malaria infection cases in Pemba and Unguja, Zanzibar.

Mentions: Placental infection was detected during 6 of 12 months of enrolment, with no seasonal variation. Unguja and Pemba accounted for six (66%) and three (33%) of the positive placental specimens, respectively (Figure 2). Detection of cases in the low-transmission season (September to December) was likely the result of increased study enrolment eligibility during these months as a result of SP stockouts (Figure 1). Seven (78%) positives originated from two of six enrolment facilities: Mwembeladu Hospital and Micheweni Health Center on Unguja and Pemba, respectively. In Pemba, placental infection (N = 3) was only detected at Micheweni, but at least one placental infection was detected at each of three Unguja facilities.


Placental malaria is rare among Zanzibari pregnant women who did not receive intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy.

Plotkin M, Said K, Msellem MI, Chase RP, Hendler N, Khamis AR, Roman E, Kitojo C, Schwartz AC, Gutman J, McElroy PD - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Placental malaria infection cases in Pemba and Unguja, Zanzibar.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125264&req=5

Figure 2: Placental malaria infection cases in Pemba and Unguja, Zanzibar.
Mentions: Placental infection was detected during 6 of 12 months of enrolment, with no seasonal variation. Unguja and Pemba accounted for six (66%) and three (33%) of the positive placental specimens, respectively (Figure 2). Detection of cases in the low-transmission season (September to December) was likely the result of increased study enrolment eligibility during these months as a result of SP stockouts (Figure 1). Seven (78%) positives originated from two of six enrolment facilities: Mwembeladu Hospital and Micheweni Health Center on Unguja and Pemba, respectively. In Pemba, placental infection (N = 3) was only detected at Micheweni, but at least one placental infection was detected at each of three Unguja facilities.

Bottom Line: Dried placental blood spot specimens were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); 9 of 1,349 specimens (0.7%; precision estimate = 0.2-1.1%) were PCR-positive for Plasmodium falciparum.Placental infection was detected on both Pemba (N = 3) and Unguja (N = 6).It may be reasonable for the Ministry of Health to consider discontinuing IPTp, intensifying surveillance efforts, and promoting insecticide-treated nets and effective case management of malaria in pregnancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jhpiego Tanzania, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Zanzibar Malaria Elimination Programme Zanzibar Ministry of Health, Tanzania; Jhpiego Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of International Health, John Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California; US President's Malaria Initiative and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Tanzania, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia Marya.Plotkin@jhpiego.org.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus