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Molecular detection of adenoviruses, rhabdoviruses, and paramyxoviruses in bats from Kenya.

Conrardy C, Tao Y, Kuzmin IV, Niezgoda M, Agwanda B, Breiman RF, Anderson LJ, Rupprecht CE, Tong S - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Bottom Line: We screened 217 bats of at least 20 species from 17 locations in Kenya during July and August of 2006 for the presence of adenovirus, rhabdovirus, and paramyxovirus nucleic acids using generic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR assays.By sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, the Kenya bat paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses from this study may represent novel viral lineages within their respective families; the Kenya bat adenoviruses could not be confirmed as novel, because the same region sequences from other known bat adenovirus genomes for comparison were lacking.Our study adds to previous evidence that bats carry diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses and may be coinfected with more than one virus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Viral Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; The Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Manhattan, Kansas; Zoology Department, National Museum, Nairobi, Kenya; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya; Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

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Phylogenetic analysis of rhabdoviruses identified in bats from Kenya. The rhabdovirus phylogenetic tree was generated based on partial RDRP gene sequences (219 nucleotides) from representative known rhabdoviruses. Viral sequences identified in bats from Kenya are noted by black circles. The trees are drawn to scale, with branch lengths measured in the number of substitutions per site. The Bayesian posterior probabilities (> 0.5) are shown at nodes.
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Figure 2: Phylogenetic analysis of rhabdoviruses identified in bats from Kenya. The rhabdovirus phylogenetic tree was generated based on partial RDRP gene sequences (219 nucleotides) from representative known rhabdoviruses. Viral sequences identified in bats from Kenya are noted by black circles. The trees are drawn to scale, with branch lengths measured in the number of substitutions per site. The Bayesian posterior probabilities (> 0.5) are shown at nodes.

Mentions: Two nearly identical rhabdovirus partial RDRP gene sequences (KY231 and KY330; 219 nucleotides) were identified in bats from two different species (M. africanus and Chaerephon sp.) in different locations. They were divergent from their near neighbors (about 60–65%% nucleotide identity by BLAST), for which relevant genetic information (L gene sequences overlapping our PCR product) is available in GenBank for comparison (Figure 2).


Molecular detection of adenoviruses, rhabdoviruses, and paramyxoviruses in bats from Kenya.

Conrardy C, Tao Y, Kuzmin IV, Niezgoda M, Agwanda B, Breiman RF, Anderson LJ, Rupprecht CE, Tong S - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Phylogenetic analysis of rhabdoviruses identified in bats from Kenya. The rhabdovirus phylogenetic tree was generated based on partial RDRP gene sequences (219 nucleotides) from representative known rhabdoviruses. Viral sequences identified in bats from Kenya are noted by black circles. The trees are drawn to scale, with branch lengths measured in the number of substitutions per site. The Bayesian posterior probabilities (> 0.5) are shown at nodes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125246&req=5

Figure 2: Phylogenetic analysis of rhabdoviruses identified in bats from Kenya. The rhabdovirus phylogenetic tree was generated based on partial RDRP gene sequences (219 nucleotides) from representative known rhabdoviruses. Viral sequences identified in bats from Kenya are noted by black circles. The trees are drawn to scale, with branch lengths measured in the number of substitutions per site. The Bayesian posterior probabilities (> 0.5) are shown at nodes.
Mentions: Two nearly identical rhabdovirus partial RDRP gene sequences (KY231 and KY330; 219 nucleotides) were identified in bats from two different species (M. africanus and Chaerephon sp.) in different locations. They were divergent from their near neighbors (about 60–65%% nucleotide identity by BLAST), for which relevant genetic information (L gene sequences overlapping our PCR product) is available in GenBank for comparison (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: We screened 217 bats of at least 20 species from 17 locations in Kenya during July and August of 2006 for the presence of adenovirus, rhabdovirus, and paramyxovirus nucleic acids using generic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR assays.By sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, the Kenya bat paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses from this study may represent novel viral lineages within their respective families; the Kenya bat adenoviruses could not be confirmed as novel, because the same region sequences from other known bat adenovirus genomes for comparison were lacking.Our study adds to previous evidence that bats carry diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses and may be coinfected with more than one virus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Viral Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; The Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Manhattan, Kansas; Zoology Department, National Museum, Nairobi, Kenya; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya; Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus