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Sequential episodes of dengue--Puerto Rico, 2005-2010.

Sharp TM, Hunsperger E, Muñoz-Jordán JL, Margolis HS, Tomashek KM - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Bottom Line: Median time between illness episodes was 2.9 years (range: 62 days-5.3 years).Seventeen (81%) individuals with sequential episodes of dengue were male, and seven (33%) were adults.All 21 individuals experienced one episode and seven (33%) individuals experienced both episodes during a large epidemic that occurred in 2010.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Dengue Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, San Juan, Puerto Rico tsharp@cdc.gov.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Time between illness onset dates for individuals experiencing sequential episodes of dengue in Puerto Rico, 2005–2010 (N = 21). Plotted on the y axis is the number of reported, laboratory-positive dengue cases each week between 2005 and 2010. Each horizontal black line represents one individual that experienced sequential episodes of dengue. The start point of each line indicates the onset date of the first reported illness, and the end point indicates the onset date of the second reported illness. Lines are ordered vertically by length.
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Figure 1: Time between illness onset dates for individuals experiencing sequential episodes of dengue in Puerto Rico, 2005–2010 (N = 21). Plotted on the y axis is the number of reported, laboratory-positive dengue cases each week between 2005 and 2010. Each horizontal black line represents one individual that experienced sequential episodes of dengue. The start point of each line indicates the onset date of the first reported illness, and the end point indicates the onset date of the second reported illness. Lines are ordered vertically by length.

Mentions: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Dengue Branch (CDC-DB) and Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) have operated the island-wide passive dengue surveillance system (PDSS) for several decades,11 which most recently detected epidemics in 200712 and 201013 (Figure 1) that were caused primarily by DENV-2 and -3, and DENV-1 and -4, respectively. The objective of this study was to use a retrospective, descriptive case series to characterize the epidemiology and DENV immunologic profile of individuals found to have sequential episodes of dengue as detected by PDSS. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards at CDC (protocol no. 6383).


Sequential episodes of dengue--Puerto Rico, 2005-2010.

Sharp TM, Hunsperger E, Muñoz-Jordán JL, Margolis HS, Tomashek KM - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Time between illness onset dates for individuals experiencing sequential episodes of dengue in Puerto Rico, 2005–2010 (N = 21). Plotted on the y axis is the number of reported, laboratory-positive dengue cases each week between 2005 and 2010. Each horizontal black line represents one individual that experienced sequential episodes of dengue. The start point of each line indicates the onset date of the first reported illness, and the end point indicates the onset date of the second reported illness. Lines are ordered vertically by length.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4125242&req=5

Figure 1: Time between illness onset dates for individuals experiencing sequential episodes of dengue in Puerto Rico, 2005–2010 (N = 21). Plotted on the y axis is the number of reported, laboratory-positive dengue cases each week between 2005 and 2010. Each horizontal black line represents one individual that experienced sequential episodes of dengue. The start point of each line indicates the onset date of the first reported illness, and the end point indicates the onset date of the second reported illness. Lines are ordered vertically by length.
Mentions: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Dengue Branch (CDC-DB) and Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) have operated the island-wide passive dengue surveillance system (PDSS) for several decades,11 which most recently detected epidemics in 200712 and 201013 (Figure 1) that were caused primarily by DENV-2 and -3, and DENV-1 and -4, respectively. The objective of this study was to use a retrospective, descriptive case series to characterize the epidemiology and DENV immunologic profile of individuals found to have sequential episodes of dengue as detected by PDSS. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards at CDC (protocol no. 6383).

Bottom Line: Median time between illness episodes was 2.9 years (range: 62 days-5.3 years).Seventeen (81%) individuals with sequential episodes of dengue were male, and seven (33%) were adults.All 21 individuals experienced one episode and seven (33%) individuals experienced both episodes during a large epidemic that occurred in 2010.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Dengue Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, San Juan, Puerto Rico tsharp@cdc.gov.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus