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Mapping track density changes in nigrostriatal and extranigral pathways in Parkinson's disease.

Ziegler E, Rouillard M, André E, Coolen T, Stender J, Balteau E, Phillips C, Garraux G - Neuroimage (2014)

Bottom Line: Twenty-seven non-demented Parkinson's patients (mean disease duration: 5 years, mean score on the Hoehn & Yahr scale=1.5) were compared with 26 elderly controls matched for age, sex, and education level.Statistically significant increases in track density were found in the Parkinson's patients, relative to controls.The results identified in brainstem and nigrostriatal pathways show a large overlap with the known distribution of neuropathological changes in non-demented PD patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium.

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Limbic system clusters. Limbic involvement was widespread, involving the cingulum, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior and dorsomedial thalamus. Clusters are overlaid on the study mean TDI map. Clusters in blue are significant below pFWE < 0.05 and clusters in red are significant at pFWE < 0.01.
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f0015: Limbic system clusters. Limbic involvement was widespread, involving the cingulum, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior and dorsomedial thalamus. Clusters are overlaid on the study mean TDI map. Clusters in blue are significant below pFWE < 0.05 and clusters in red are significant at pFWE < 0.01.

Mentions: TDI increases were found in the ventral tegmental area and in white matter regions surrounding the ventral striatum both medially and laterally. The pallidum, as well as the anterior and dorsomedial nuclei of the thalamus were also affected. At the cortical level, the entire cingulum was affected heavily in the right hemisphere, but only in posterior regions of the left hemisphere. Bilateral increases in TDI were also found in the orbitofrontal cortex. Fig. 3 shows slices of affected areas in the limbic system.


Mapping track density changes in nigrostriatal and extranigral pathways in Parkinson's disease.

Ziegler E, Rouillard M, André E, Coolen T, Stender J, Balteau E, Phillips C, Garraux G - Neuroimage (2014)

Limbic system clusters. Limbic involvement was widespread, involving the cingulum, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior and dorsomedial thalamus. Clusters are overlaid on the study mean TDI map. Clusters in blue are significant below pFWE < 0.05 and clusters in red are significant at pFWE < 0.01.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4121087&req=5

f0015: Limbic system clusters. Limbic involvement was widespread, involving the cingulum, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior and dorsomedial thalamus. Clusters are overlaid on the study mean TDI map. Clusters in blue are significant below pFWE < 0.05 and clusters in red are significant at pFWE < 0.01.
Mentions: TDI increases were found in the ventral tegmental area and in white matter regions surrounding the ventral striatum both medially and laterally. The pallidum, as well as the anterior and dorsomedial nuclei of the thalamus were also affected. At the cortical level, the entire cingulum was affected heavily in the right hemisphere, but only in posterior regions of the left hemisphere. Bilateral increases in TDI were also found in the orbitofrontal cortex. Fig. 3 shows slices of affected areas in the limbic system.

Bottom Line: Twenty-seven non-demented Parkinson's patients (mean disease duration: 5 years, mean score on the Hoehn & Yahr scale=1.5) were compared with 26 elderly controls matched for age, sex, and education level.Statistically significant increases in track density were found in the Parkinson's patients, relative to controls.The results identified in brainstem and nigrostriatal pathways show a large overlap with the known distribution of neuropathological changes in non-demented PD patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus